deficiency

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Deficiency

The amount by which a project's cash flow is not adequate to meet debt service.

Deficiency

1. The amount by which cash flow falls short of debt service. For example, if a company has $300,000 in current liabilities and only $250,000 in cash flow for a given year, its deficiency is $50,000.

2. In taxation, the amount by which one's tax liability exceeds what the individual person or organization reported. For example, if the IRS disallows certain deductions that the taxpayer applied, he/she will owe more in taxes than he/she reported on the return. Deficiency is the amount this taxpayer still owes to the IRS.

deficiency

1. The amount by which an individual's or an organization's tax liability as computed by the Internal Revenue Service exceeds the tax liability reported by the taxpayer.
2. The amount by which a firm's liabilities exceed assets.

deficiency

The amount due on a mortgage loan after adding all expenses of foreclosure and accrued interest to the principal balance of the loan and then deducting the sale price or lender-bid price for the property. The balance remaining, if any, may be collected by the lender by means of taking a deficiency judgment, unless prohibited by law or contract. Deficiency judgments may be collected just like any other judgment, through seizure of other assets or garnishment. There are two circumstances when a lender may not collect any deficiency:

1. In states with consumer protection statutes that outlaw deficiencies on first mortgages on a borrower's principal residence.

2. With mortgage loans designated as nonrecourse, meaning the lender and borrower agreed in advance that the property would stand for the debt and there would be no deficiency allowed in the event of foreclosure.

References in periodicals archive ?
12] deficiency, particularly when the cause is not a dietary deficiency, is parenteral administration--usually by intramuscular injection--of cyanocobalamin (and in rare occasions, hydroxocobalamin).
Although we don't know for certain what each and every individual needs, we do know that if you consume nutrients at the level of their RDAs, your risk of developing a dietary deficiency disease is only 2 percent or less.
Research continues to support the fact that obesity is linked to dietary deficiency rather than purely overeating.
The findings reiterate the dietary deficiency among adolescent girls which adversely affects the nutritional status.
CONCLUSIONS: The development of stress fractures in young recruits during combat BT was associated with dietary deficiency before induction and during BT of mainly vitamin D and calcium.
It was a good approach to address a dietary deficiency disease, because so many people drink milk, which is already loaded with nutrients.
The evidence of n3 FA dietary deficiency in studies looking at cell membrane composition of autistic children versus controls (Altern.
But flabby arms and legs are the least of your problems if you have this dietary deficiency.
Diarrhea, dietary deficiency (including protein-calorie malnutrition, parenteral and enteral feeding with inadequate magnesium, alcoholism, and pregnancy), familial magnesium malabsorption, gastrointestinal fistulas, inflammatory bowel disease, laxative abuse, malabsorption (sprue, steatorrhea, chronic pancreatitis), nasogastric suction, surgical resection, vomiting
Pica can very rarely be due to a dietary deficiency.