Diaspora

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Diaspora

The persons of a community living outside their area or ancestral homeland, especially but not necessarily as a community. A diaspora can create and sustain trade and other economic ties between two areas. For example, a businessman from one ethnic group may communicate with a relative in the homeland in order to set up an import-export company.
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Chapter two examines Lawrence Hill's The Book of Negroes and the power of narrating "black diasporic subjectivity into being" (98).
Vorobeichic's radical diasporic art thus "mitigates nostalgia and reinforces it"; in Zemel's smart reading, Vorobeichic's "fragmented figures, gestures, and objects become fetishized emblems of Jewish tradition.
Andrews, himself a diasporic Englishman who not only buttressed the cause from Fiji, and persuaded the Mahatma-in-the-making to return to India to continue the struggle, but also brought the gospel of satyagraha to the southern Caribbean.
Critique: A seminal body of original scholarship that is enhanced with the inclusion of a ten page Bibliography, a four page listing of the contributors and their credentials, and a thirty-four page Index, "Canadian Women Shaping Diasporic Religious Identities " is very highly recommended for college and university library Women's Studies and Canadian Cultural Studies reference collections.
As Sams argues, Irish works have on the whole been more readily absorbed in the British theatrical establishment, however the works of dramatists such as Mary O'Malley, Ron Hutchinson and Tom Murphy have directly engaged with the diasporic experience and presented complicated pictures of "intercultural hostilities and rejections" (35).
The Caribbean diasporic writers that Machado Saez examines are, she claims, positioned at "the intersection of ethnic and world literatures, local and global histories, [and] multicultural and postcolonial discourses" (2), so that even as they struggle with the marketability of their ethnicity they also present a postcolonial ethics of historical revision.
frames a diasporic feminist theology that resonates with her current location, and with her multiple sociopolitical locations within the global context.
through the transnational circuits of exchange of diasporic resources and repertoires of power .
Furthermore, the plays suggest that engaging with women of the past can be a catalyst for diasporic women to reexamine their own identities and desires in ways that challenge the intersection of oppressions that Black British and Asian American women face.
Madison's piece might be better viewed as a manifesto for a generalising usage of 'black', without recognising that what might be a position of identification and affiliation for one generation (especially people with a modern migratory heritage), can become nominal in the next, even as repercussions of histories and consequences can be shared across the globe via diasporic connections.
India and the Diasporic Imagination is the admirable publication of papers presented at the international conference held in France at the Universite Paul Valery in April 2009, with all but three papers written in English.
This version of diasporic thinking complements American egalitarianism at the same time that it expands the scope and affect of traditional Jewish humor.