Diaspora

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Diaspora

The persons of a community living outside their area or ancestral homeland, especially but not necessarily as a community. A diaspora can create and sustain trade and other economic ties between two areas. For example, a businessman from one ethnic group may communicate with a relative in the homeland in order to set up an import-export company.
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These beginning scenes, both in their plot and in their extensive use of literary and historical quotations, set up key thematic concerns of the play: the way that textuality can make space for sexuality, the potential of claiming the Western tradition as one's own but also the treacherous nature of this process (as expressed here both by quotations from the Western literary canon and the effects of Moj's literacy), and the multiplicity of diasporic identities that Moj encompasses, seen in the way that Moj identifies with--and loves--another slave but is separated from her by the privilege borne of Moj's connection to Western power.
In his concise conclusion, Rosales Herrera reiterates the undeniable representation of the experience of exile in diasporic Cuban literature and how various authors have embedded personal accounts into their fictional texts with the ubiquitous "yo" or first-person perspective.
Furthermore, unlike some Catholic Goans living in Goa who have embraced a syncretic Catholic/Hindu/Indian identity (Henn 2008), many diasporic Catholic Goans continue to practice western cultural norms (albeit with an Indian twist), without any noticeable desire to let go of these norms and claim a post-colonial identity.
Hage's narrator challenges the First World reader, particularly the mainstream Canadian reader, to reconsider the implied relationship between him/herself and the diasporic subject, a relationship conceived through the lens of Canadian national rhetoric, Canadian literary criticism, diasporic theory, and trauma theory.
Williams describes the role of American Welshdanguage press in unifying the diasporic Welsh community, while Newton and MacLennan write about negotiations of Scottish racial identity and morality, respectively, in Gaelic and English-language press.
In Chapter 2 Makalani explores Blacks' radical alliances with Diasporic Africans through their understanding of race with the point of entry as the establishment of the ABB, and the Crusader (1918).
The principles of acoustemology allow Feld to tie these disparate stories together as enactments of musical imagination and intimacy that demonstrate "intermingled struggles for African and diasporic freedoms, American civil rights, and U.
The diasporic interpretative and critical attempts have often confined themselves to what is obvious, more specifically to the emotional turmoil, cultural tensions, and socioeconomic restraint and restrictions.
Part three, "Rapping B(l)ack," examines music and visual art of the "black masculinity" within the diasporic productions of the hip-hop musician Wyclef comparing the roots of his music with the rock band Boukman Eksperyans.
As a travelling subject he opens up a part of Africa in order for the reader and for himself to understand an intriguing part of Africa, that is, Liberia and its diasporic community on Staten Island, allowing him the opportunity to reflect on notions of identity, or more in particular African identity, ethnicity, exile and displacement, thus moving away from the more traditional dichotomous interplay between home and abroad as he inserts himself as a travelling persona into the text.
In an effort to examine Israel's "agents" in the construction of the Jewish diasporic narrative, he uses several methodologies to gather sources.
1) In association with the spectacular growth in East Asia after the late 1970s, two main strands of interpretations emerged pertaining to diasporic Chinese business and entrepreneurship in the Asia Pacific, with emphases on culturalist paradigm and structuralist imperatives, respectively.