Diaspora

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Diaspora

The persons of a community living outside their area or ancestral homeland, especially but not necessarily as a community. A diaspora can create and sustain trade and other economic ties between two areas. For example, a businessman from one ethnic group may communicate with a relative in the homeland in order to set up an import-export company.
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Aluminum hydroxide minerals in various proportions except bauxite are conventionally found in Gibbsite with the combination of [Al (OH) 3] and polymorphs like boehmite and diaspore [AlO (OH)].
Established disjunct species evidence diaspore movement and provide a baseline for assessing the frequency of dispersal but this baseline recognizably fails to reflect dispersal with precision.
In this context, this study aimed to evaluate the allelopathic potential of aqueous extracts of young and mature leaves of Sapindus saponaria on the germination of diaspores and growth of seedlings of Echinochloa crus-galli (L.
Morphological patterns of diaspores from animal-dispersed tree and treelet species at Parque Estadual de Itapua, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil.
Mass allocation, moisture content, and dispersal capacity of wind-dispersed tropical diaspores.
The Petri dishes that contained the diaspores were taken to a germination chamber (Mangelsdorf type to lettuce and B.
The effects of morphology, orientation and position of grass diaspores on seedling survival.
The feasibility of intercontinental sedge dispersal by migrating waterfowl was shown by de Vlaming and Proctor (1968) who demonstrated viability of Carex and other sedge diaspores after more than 24h in the digestive systems of mallard ducks and suggested that these highly resistant seeds were an adaptive trait in wetland sedges.
Although these factors may play a role, the results of the present study suggest that epiphytic species may simply have larger ranges because they have diaspores that are predisposed for long-distance dispersal.
Although this definition includes many species that produce relatively small propagules, I restrict its meaning in this review to those relatively large diaspores that are dispersed in the wild by birds and rodents that scatter hoard food items in the soil.