Diaspora

(redirected from diasporas)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to diasporas: diasporic

Diaspora

The persons of a community living outside their area or ancestral homeland, especially but not necessarily as a community. A diaspora can create and sustain trade and other economic ties between two areas. For example, a businessman from one ethnic group may communicate with a relative in the homeland in order to set up an import-export company.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The Act however, does not make provision for voting rights for Nigerians in the Diaspora during general elections.
The holding the first forum will also involve the preparation of a joint action strategy of heads of diaspora organisations of Turkic-speaking people and the issues relating to the establishment of a coordinating council will be discussed.
Third, in relation to many countries, especially developing countries, their diasporas, often residing in developed western countries, have considerable financial and political clout.
1) Hall, Jonathan and Swain, Ashok, "Catapulting Conflicts or Propelling Peace: Diasporas and Civil War", in: Swain, Ashok, Amer, Ramses and Ojendal, Joakim, (eds.
A distinct change in the way conflicts begin and develop means that a new framework is needed for examining them, and diasporas provide a new lens through which to look for solutions to many violent conflicts in the world today.
To sign up to the platform and start finding and engaging with opportunities from the international diasporas and their partners, please go to www.
Objectives : The goal of this project is to improve framework conditions for Diaspora organisations; this is expected enhance the cooperation potential of the African diaspora in countries of destination for sustainable development in countries of origin.
The very diversity of the book, however, is a limitation, for no concluding chapter pulls the motley collection of essays together to provide a definitive argument or insight regarding diasporas and mission in the twenty-first century.
They would be pressured to secure absentee ballots, and use expensive means to disseminate them to different corners of the globe in order to reach out to their Diasporas.
Given this fundamental characteristic of community life in new media spaces, it is somewhat surprising that till the publication of Diasporas in the New Media Age, no scholarly work had taken up the topic of the relationship between diasporas and new media as its central object of inquiry.
Unlike countries such as Italy and Greece, whose diasporas feature all those of Italian or Greek origin, our government does not include all former residents of Canada or descendants of Canadians.
The New African Diaspora offers a collection of essays that examine that distribution from different perspectives, including that from a geographic perspective.