deregulate

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Deregulate

To reduce the amount of regulation over a market or economy. It may include reduced or eliminated requirements for reporting or filing statements with regulators. Deregulating may allow an organization to conduct more activities than it could before; for example, it may allow a bank to make more high risk investments. Deregulation is intended to increase efficiency in the market by letting the Invisible Hand guide the economy apart from government intervention. Opponents, however, argue that deregulation increases the likelihood of fraud and unfair practices such as insider trading. Many analysts agree that deregulation helps firms on solid financial footing and hurts those that are not.

deregulate

To reduce or eliminate control. One of the major forces in the financial markets in the 1970s and 1980s was the federal government's decision to deregulate interest rates. The commissions charged to investors on security trades were deregulated in 1975.
References in periodicals archive ?
Appoint deregulators to head up independent agencies such as the Federal Communications Commission, the Federal Election Commission, and so on, then cheer on their works.
There was not the slightest possibility that he would not adopt the vigorous deregulatory program that Carter had in mind, and after Carter appointed another deregulator, Elizabeth Bailey, to the CAB, see id.
Another view argues that the chairman isn't the deregulator he's reputed to be--that in fact, he's made the government more intrusive.
Summers, then a deregulator, now wants tougher financial regulations.
With the head of a deregulator but a heart that goes out to the little guy, the Arizona Republican, in the words of Andrew Jay Schwartzman, president and CEO of the Media Access Project, "is not just a maverick, he's also a little bit eccentric.
hardly a raving deregulator, upbraided Kessler for his agency's recalcitrance.
In our last episode, you will recall, the incomparable deregulator Richard Pratt had done his dirty work and then quit in 1983.
Even the great deregulator, Alfred Kahn, concedes that electricity "may be the one industry in which it [vertical-integration monopoly ownership of distribution and generation] works reasonably well.
Thorne Auchter was the OSHA head in 1981, an ardent deregulator.
With radical deregulators like Scott Pruitt, Jeff Sessions, and Betsy DeVos at the helm of key federal agencies, there's a real concern among regulatory advocates that they will cook the books when removing regulations, going through the motions of the formal rulemaking process while contorting the data and analysis to get a desired result.
At the EPA, for example, the chief target of many deregulators, Administrator Scott Pruitt is working with very few politically appointed deputies.
Does this not justify the cavalier views of the deregulators and the politicians?