depreciable life

depreciable life

See accelerated cost recovery system.

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With respect to commercial property, certain costs thought to be classified as subject to a 39-year depreciable life, can instead be classified as personal property or land improvements, with a 5, 7, or 15-year rate of depreciation using accelerated methods.
The increase in operating income was due primarily to (a) additional depreciation expense recognized in the 2013 Period as a result of the reduction in the depreciable life of Van Ness Square ($8.
For example, personal tangible property with a seven-year MACRS depreciable life may be subject to a 10- or 12-year ADS depreciable life.
IREM strongly supports efforts to more accurately measure the depreciable life of buildings and to conform amortization periods of tenant improvements more closely to the term of the lease.
If so, the economic useful life of the unit of property is the depreciable life reflected on the applicable financial statement, unless the taxpayer can show by "clear and convincing evidence" that a shorter useful life is appropriate.
IRS codes require a 39-year depreciable life for buildings.
The innovations are expected to save more than 4 million gallons of water, 24 million cubic feet of natural gas and $1 million in operating costs over the 30-year depreciable life of the building.
Unfortunately, the officials would rather let the shortage continue than allow some people a shorter depreciable life on a building, or to offset inflation by having lower capital gains tax rates.
The normal MACRS life for an automobile is five years, but since the amount of LLAR limits the annual deduction, the depreciable life of the vehicle is extended.
The 1981 act drastically shortened the depreciable life to 15 years for real estate purchased after 1980 and allowed accelerated depreciation for such property, regardless of its use or age.
Interest cost is indeed an important consideration, but there are a host of other issues, including the useful life of the instrument, depreciable life, investment tax credits, and maintenance and supply convenience.