depreciable life

depreciable life

See accelerated cost recovery system.

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And land improvements--such as parking lots, sidewalks, fences and outdoor lighting--enjoy a 15-year depreciable life.
This disposal accelerates depreciation via the abandonment of adjusted basis that otherwise would have had to be recognized over the remaining years of the asset's depreciable life.
The business may be able to recover the cost more or less quickly as a capitalized repair cost than as a startup cost depending on the depreciable life of the asset for which the business capitalizes the cost.
In a few situations, Revenue Procedure 87-56 will assign the land improvement to a different asset class requiring a shorter recovery period; thus, the business activity in which the taxpayer is engaged may have an effect upon the depreciable life of the improvement for the purposes of applying Revenue Procedure 87-56.
IREM strongly supports efforts to more accurately measure the depreciable life of buildings and to conform amortization periods of tenant improvements more closely to the term of the lease.
The Tax Reform Act of 1986 increased the depreciable life of real estate to 31.
If so, the economic useful life of the unit of property is the depreciable life reflected on the applicable financial statement, unless the taxpayer can show by "clear and convincing evidence" that a shorter useful life is appropriate.
IRS codes require a 39-year depreciable life for buildings.
The innovations are expected to save more than 4 million gallons of water, 24 million cubic feet of natural gas and $1 million in operating costs over the 30-year depreciable life of the building.
Unfortunately, the officials would rather let the shortage continue than allow some people a shorter depreciable life on a building, or to offset inflation by having lower capital gains tax rates.
The 1981 act drastically shortened the depreciable life to 15 years for real estate purchased after 1980 and allowed accelerated depreciation for such property, regardless of its use or age.