depreciable


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.

depreciable

Of, relating to, or being a long-term tangible asset that is subject to depreciation.
References in periodicals archive ?
If practicable, a taxpayer must use its records to determine the removed component's unadjusted depreciable basis (which is then used to determine the adjusted depreciable basis).
Under MACRS, property placed in service and disposed of in the same tax year is not depreciable.
Partial dispositions of tangible depreciable assets to which an IRS adjustment under Prop.
It organizes depreciable hospital assets into nine tables according to common general ledger categories, then lists the assets in alphabetical order with their estimated useful lives and the number of the table in which they are located.
IREM strongly supports efforts to more accurately measure the depreciable life of buildings and to conform amortization periods of tenant improvements more closely to the term of the lease.
Thus, for a taxpayer having an applicable financial statement, even though the unit of property's economic useful life is determined based on the depreciable life reflected on that financial statement, if the period over which the asset is expected to be economically useful to the taxpayer is longer, that longer period will be the measure for whether that property's useful life has been "substantially prolonged.
The client claimed the land represented only 20% or $150,000 of the purchase price, so the depreciable basis of the improvements was $600,000.
American companies plan to increas e their investment spending slightly this year, according to a Government survey of 30,000 businesses on their spending plans for depreciable capital assets like buildings, structures, machinery and other equipment.
Whether a subscription list is a depreciable asset may seem an arcane subject to those who labor in the news, advertising and production departments, but this is an issue that goes to the heart of newspaper economics.
The National Association of Real Estate Investment Trusts ("NAREIT") defines funds from operations as Net Income (Loss) determined in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles ("GAAP"), excluding gains (or losses) from sales of depreciable operating property, excluding extraordinary items (determined by GAAP), excluding depreciation and amortization of real estate assets, and including the impact of adjustments for unconsolidated partnerships and joint ventures.
For example, consider the situation in which a taxpayer has a capital contribution and must determine whether receipt requires the taxpayer to recognize gross income, which creates basis in a depreciable asset, or whether the taxpayer does not have gross income and has no basis in a depreciable asset.
174 treatment when the resulting product is subsequently sold to a customer, because the sale makes the product depreciable property in the customer's hands.