Dependent

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Related to dependency: Functional dependency, Dependency theory

Dependent

Acceptance of a capital budgeting project contingent on the acceptance of another project.

Dependent

An individual for whom another individual is financially responsible. For example, if a working mother has a child, the child is her dependent. Likewise, if a man is taking care of his father in his old age, the father is a dependent. One may normally receive a tax credit for dependents. See also: Child Tax Credit.

Dependent

An individual who qualifies to be claimed as a dependent exemption on another person's income tax return.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the first step, we take one dependency from the shorter sentence in terms of number of dependencies (a computational efficiency trick) and identify dependencies of the same type in the other sentence.
0] hours, where H is time constant of temperature dependency.
Because we are impatient people, because policy makers want results today, and because those who reimburse for chemical dependency treatment (including the federal and state governments) want real outcomes for their dollars, some are tempted to believe, and in some cases mandating, that treatment's goal lies with reducing cravings and regulating and normalizing pleasure.
The General Plan or General Goal has a dependency with another organizational actor.
Medical Problems in Dentistry, Fourth Edition: Chemical Dependency, pp 490-491.
The first discusses the nature of dependency relations and their moral dimensions.
The problem with dependency theory is that, in point of fact, Washington doesn't give a rat's ass about Latin America from an economic standpoint.
This edition's Fact File examines dependency ratios in Asia-Pacific nations.
reinforced the belief that schooling was necessary to prevent dependency - even though full-time schooling represents guaranteed dependency for a large portion of a person's life.
Moral arguments for the exclusion of persons with alcohol dependency from gaining access to liver transplantations are examined.