demography

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demography

the analysis of human POPULATIONS according to their total size, birth rates, death rates and migration; the age and sex distribution of populations and their geographical and occupational distributions; racial and religious profiles, etc.

Firms need to monitor changes in the demographic environment because these changes can have a significant impact on the demand for particular CONSUMER GOODS and SERVICES. For instance, the increase in the proportions of elderly citizens in the total population in most industrialized countries over recent decades has created new market opportunities for companies in such areas as health care and leisure products; while declining birth rates have reduced the demand for children's clothing and toys. See SOCIOECONOMIC GROUP.

demography

the study of human POPULATIONS, including their total size, population changes over time as determined by changes in BIRTH RATES, DEATH RATES and MIGRATION; the age and sex distribution of populations and their geographical and occupational distributions. Statistical data on populations is compiled from CENSUSES of population and records of births, See DEMOGRAPHIC TRANSITION.

demography

A study of the characteristics of people living in an area.

References in periodicals archive ?
Demographer Bernard Salt noted that at present, the average household had plasma televisions, can travel overseas and fond of eating at cafes and restaurants on a regular manner.
On perhaps the most positive note in the new projections, UN Population Division demographers believe that every country in the world currently is experiencing a longer life expectancy in the 2010-to-2015 period than between 2000 and 2010.
Any look at future population is guesswork, and the world's principal demographer, the United Nations, admits as much.
Frey, a demographer from the University of Michigan's Population Studies Center and the Brookings Institution.
For the demographer, there is nothing new in this chapter that has not been dealt with in much greater detail elsewhere, as for example, in Hinde's (1998) very own excellent textbook on demographic methods.
Although the CFR is more accurate, demographers prefer to use the TFR because it provides more up-to-date information on current trends in fertility.
Despite the overall reduction of the undercount estimate, the demographers found more undocumented immigrants than they had expected.
Also disturbing to demographers is that the number of Americans living alone increased to 26 percent, surpassing for the first time the number of married-couples-with-children house holds.
Now, 20 percent of baby boomer women are childless and likely to remain so, and demographers predict that as much as a quarter of American women born between 1956 and 1972 will never have children.
Nearly all demographers now agree that the world's population will top out at about 8.
This review corroborated our argument that the relationship between maternal education and child health is relatively weak and that this has been known to demographers working in this area for some time and has been documented in publicly accessible literature.
In fact, demographers have said that by 2050, several million Americans will be 100 years and older (at the beginning of the 1980s there were 18,000).