deficiency

(redirected from deficiency disease)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to deficiency disease: hereditary disease, scurvy

Deficiency

The amount by which a project's cash flow is not adequate to meet debt service.

Deficiency

1. The amount by which cash flow falls short of debt service. For example, if a company has $300,000 in current liabilities and only $250,000 in cash flow for a given year, its deficiency is $50,000.

2. In taxation, the amount by which one's tax liability exceeds what the individual person or organization reported. For example, if the IRS disallows certain deductions that the taxpayer applied, he/she will owe more in taxes than he/she reported on the return. Deficiency is the amount this taxpayer still owes to the IRS.

deficiency

1. The amount by which an individual's or an organization's tax liability as computed by the Internal Revenue Service exceeds the tax liability reported by the taxpayer.
2. The amount by which a firm's liabilities exceed assets.

deficiency

The amount due on a mortgage loan after adding all expenses of foreclosure and accrued interest to the principal balance of the loan and then deducting the sale price or lender-bid price for the property. The balance remaining, if any, may be collected by the lender by means of taking a deficiency judgment, unless prohibited by law or contract. Deficiency judgments may be collected just like any other judgment, through seizure of other assets or garnishment. There are two circumstances when a lender may not collect any deficiency:

1. In states with consumer protection statutes that outlaw deficiencies on first mortgages on a borrower's principal residence.

2. With mortgage loans designated as nonrecourse, meaning the lender and borrower agreed in advance that the property would stand for the debt and there would be no deficiency allowed in the event of foreclosure.

References in periodicals archive ?
The Immune Deficiency Foundation (IDF), the nation's leading nonprofit patient organization for primary immune deficiency diseases, and FFF Enterprises Inc.
Additionally, and as part of the criteria for selection as the initial preferred provider, US Bioservices has agreed to remain a core services supporter of IDF and to fund IDF research and patient services for primary immune deficiency diseases.
The FDA approval of CHOLBAM is of vital importance to patients and families who are dealing with bile acid deficiency diseases," said Philip Rosenthal, MD, Director of Pediatric Hepatology at the University of California, San Francisco.
Some of these disorders are inherited congenitally, leading to the growing list of primary immune deficiency diseases (PIDDs), a set of diseases distinguished from acquired syndromes or those occurring secondary to known sequelae.
Children who suffer from immune deficiency diseases, such as HIV or similar congenital diseases, or those who are allergic to vaccines, should avoid this vaccination," he added.
The guidelines stress that atopic dermatitis is a clinical diagnosis that requires ruling out contact dermatitis, cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, psoriasis, photosensitivity reactions, seborrheic dermatitis, and immune deficiency diseases.
Vitamins A and D are two essential micronutrients added to fluid milk as fortified food in order to prevent deficiency diseases.
The work has already helped doctors diagnose a severe form of epilepsy and immune deficiency diseases in children.
The shortfall in vitamin D in young children is worrying and the impact is already being seen in hospitals and GP surgeries, with the return of rickets and other deficiency diseases.
22 years in 2011 and socio-demographic patterns in the Sultanate are deemed to be in an 'epidemiological transition' phase marked by the 'shift from the acute infectious and deficiency diseases characteristic of underdevelopment to the chronic non-communicable diseases characteristic of modernisation and advanced levels of development.
The progression of these deficiency diseases may be modulated by newly recognized dietary factors distinct from the previously characterized essential nutrients.
By increasing one's vitamin D levels, the risk of cancer and other long-latency deficiency diseases can be reduced.