informed consent

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informed consent

Consent given after being provided with fair and full disclosure of all the facts necessary to make an intelligent decision after weighing the relative pros and cons of the situation and the possibility of realistic alternatives.Real estate agents may sometimes represent both buyers and sellers in the same transaction if all parties agree after informed consent.

References in periodicals archive ?
Woodward said, but it didn't remove the fear of litigation that drives defensive medicine.
Using the average national Medicare payment information from the 2011 Current Procedural-Terminology (CPT) code reimbursement data, the cost of defensive medicine per orthopedic surgeon respondent was approximately $8,500 per month or $100,000 per year, representing 24 percent of a physician's annual spending.
Overall, the AMA estimates, defensive medicine alone adds from $84 billion to $151 billion of costs to the nation's healthcare system annually, which is significantly more than the estimates from the Harvard School of Public Health study.
Nevertheless, he also noted his interest in medical liability reforms by calling for federal incentives for states "to experiment much more vigorously with ways to reduce frivolous lawsuits, to pursue settlements, to reduce defensive medicine.
They still complain about lawsuits and practice defensive medicine, perhaps because that approach generates more revenue for the practice.
Lower malpractice premiums translate into lower prices for health services and the reduction in defensive medicine means that fewer tests and procedures are performed, implying a reduction in health services utilization.
Defensive medicine is not ordering every test or procedure known to man.
Defensive medicine could also cause a reduction in care: rising malpractice liability could discourage physicians from accepting certain high-risk or uninsured patients.
Brody, president of Johns Hopkins University, says that the direct cost of malpractice lawsuits is between $16 and $32 billion a year and that the indirect cost of malpractice lawsuits--such as defensive medicine whereby doctors order unneeded tests to avoid lawsuits--is in the range of $50 to $100 billion a year.
Liability encourages substantial defensive medicine.
A lot of doctors resent official time limits with patients, feel over-scrutinised and forced to practice defensive medicine - recording every last detail in notes to cover their backs - and not spending enough time with the patients themselves.
The GAO is very wary of claims that the tort system encourages unnecessary defensive medicine and, in fact, suggests that some defensive medicine is good medicine.