Decoupling

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Decoupling

A situation in which returns on two assets or asset classes that normally move together move separately. For example, oil and natural gas prices usually move together: when one goes up, so does the other, and vice versa. Likewise, stocks and corporate bonds usually behave the same way. Decoupling in both cases occurs when oil moves in one direction while natural gas moves in the opposite, or when stocks' and corporate bonds' returns diverge.
References in periodicals archive ?
Decouple indicators on the CO2 emission-economic growth linkage: the Jiangsu Province case.
That's the size needed to fully decouple a 20-kiloton nuclear explosion.
In a series of studies on executive incentive programs (Zajac and Westphal, 1995; Westphal and Zajac, 1998), they developed a sociopolitical perspective on decoupling and provided evidence that firms were more likely to decouple incentive programs for chief executive officers (CEOs) from actual practice when CEOs were relatively powerful vis a vis the board of directors.
Because of the possibility that additional states may decouple from the federal provisions, it is important to check the status of a state before preparing its tax return or amending a prior filed return.
Photo: Cavities and dry alluvium (gravel) can muffle, or decouple, an explosion that would otherwise produce much higher-magnitude seismic waves in hard rock.
The Commission largely agreed and planned to phase out all current tobacco payments over three years, decouple 100% of the existing tobacco premium and end the Community Tobacco Fund which pays for public health promotions.
Trucost assessed the ability of organisations to decouple financial growth from environmental impact, by increasing revenue whilst decreasing their absolute impact.
It wants to phase out all current tobacco payments over three years, decouple 100% of the existing tobacco premium and gradually end the Community Tobacco Fund.
On tobacco, a clear North-South divide has emerged in working groups (see issue 2845) with most producing countries fiercely opposing the Commission's plans to decouple 100% of tobacco payments.
In the Parliament's Agriculture Committee, MEPs rejected the Commission's plans to partially decouple aid for cotton and olive oil producers, saying it would lead to rural depopulation in poor rural areas.
The UK may propose that Member States should be allowed to decouple more than 60% of payments if they wish to, as is the case in the reform of the Common Agricultural Policy agreed on June 26.