decline

(redirected from declines)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.

Decline

A situation in which a stock or other security that has dropped in price over a given period. For example, if a stock opens at $5 and closes at $4.45, it is said to have declined for that trading day.

decline

A decrease in the price of a security.
References in classic literature ?
Creamer, to state that my health is such that all strong emotions would be dangerous in my present delicate condition--and that I must decline any family discussions or interviews whatever.
He might well have added that the Roman power was at its zenith when every citizen acknowledged his liability to fight for the State, but that it began to decline as soon as this obligation was no longer recognized.
knows a decline is apprehended; he saw her this morning: she returns to Wimpole Street to-day; the old lady is come.
It seemed to me a little ungracious to decline an invitation of that sort, and I ascribed his refusal to lack of money.
Then I decline to interfere," said the Governor, with asperity; "a man who abuses his office by making it serve a private end and purvey a personal advantage is unfit to be free.
The early Greek epic -- that is, poetry as a natural and popular, and not (as it became later) an artificial and academic literary form -- passed through the usual three phases, of development, of maturity, and of decline.
Blanche might decline to submit to her step-mother's interference with her.
Indeed, this may be thought too detrimental a scheme to the French interest, since they would thus lose the advantage they have over other nations in the superiority of their engineers; but when I consider the gallantry and generosity of that people, I am persuaded they would never decline putting themselves upon a par with their adversary; or, as the phrase is, making themselves his match.
To decline the flattering and dangerous appointment at Tashkend would have been, Vronsky had till then considered, disgraceful and impossible.
I heard of the slothful Asiatics, of the stupendous genius and mental activity of the Grecians, of the wars and wonderful virtue of the early Romans--of their subsequent degenerating--of the decline of that mighty empire, of chivalry, Christianity, and kings.
Mr Wegg would even have picked a handsome quarrel with any one who should have challenged his deep acquaintance with those aforesaid eight volumes of Decline and Fall.
These artless sports had naturally soothed and cheered the decline of her widowed father: a most exemplary gentleman (called