debt


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Related to debt: Debt Financing, Debt relief

Debt

Money borrowed.

Debt

Any money owed to an individual, company, or other organization. One acquires debt when one borrows money. Generally speaking, one acquires debt for a specific purpose, such as funding a college education or purchasing a house. In business and government, debt is often issued in the form of bonds, which are tradeable securities entitling the bearer to repayment at the appropriate time(s). Occasionally, especially for personal loans, debt is issued without interest or other compensation; one simply pays back what was lent. This is exceedingly rare in business and a debtor almost always compensates a creditor with a certain amount of interest, representing the time value of money. However, some areas of finance, especially Islamic banking, do not allow debt with interest.

debt

See liability.

Debt.

A debt is an obligation to repay an amount you owe. Debt securities, such as bonds or commercial paper, are forms of debt that bind the issuer, such as a corporation, bank, or government, to repay the security holder. Debts are also known as liabilities.

debt

an amount of money owed by one person, company, etc. to another. Debts result from borrowing money to purchase a product, service or financial asset (e.g. INSTALMENT CREDIT). Debt contracts provide for the eventual repayment of the sum borrowed and include INTEREST charges for the duration of the LOAN. See DEBTORS. BORROWER.

debt

an amount of money owed by a person, firm or government (the borrower) to a lender. Debts arise when individuals, etc., spend more than their current income or when they deliberately plan to borrow money to purchase specific goods, services or ASSETS (houses, financial securities, etc.). Debt contracts provide for the eventual repayment of the sum borrowed and include INTEREST charges for the duration of the loan. An individual's debt can include MORTGAGES, INSTALMENT CREDIT, BANK LOANS and OVERDRAFTS; a firm's debt can include fixed-interest DEBENTURES, LOANS, BILLS OF EXCHANGE and bank loans and overdrafts; a government's ebt can take the form of long-term BONDS and short-term TREASURY BILLS (see NATIONAL DEBT). See PUBLIC SECTOR BORROWING REQUIREMENT.

See also INTERNATIONAL DEBT.

debt

An obligation to pay another.

References in classic literature ?
Herbert would also take a sheet of paper, and write across it with similar formalities, "Memorandum of Herbert's debts.
But why did the clerks at the bank let him have them--they ought to have known that you had all this money to pay, and people cannot well pay debts without money.
Either pay thy debt as I have said, or release thy land and get thee gone from out my hall.
During the strike, of course, they spent all that they had saved, and would often return to work in debt at the same wages, or would move to another mine at considerable expense.
When Fred stated the circumstances of his debt, his wish to meet it without troubling his father, and the certainty that the money would be forthcoming so as to cause no one any inconvenience, Caleb pushed his spectacles upward, listened, looked into his favorite's clear young eyes, and believed him, not distinguishing confidence about the future from veracity about the past; but he felt that it was an occasion for a friendly hint as to conduct, and that before giving his signature he must give a rather strong admonition.
He actually opened a bank account, where, without a debt in the world, he had several hundred dollars to his credit.
Gobseck, Werdet, and Gigonnet swallowed the profits, but des Lupeaulx had agreed that they should have them; he was not playing for a stake; he challenged the bank, as it were, knowing very well that the king was not a man to forget this debt of honor.
At length one day his landlady, finding he could not pay his rent, arrested him for debt.
His father said he wouldn't give him any and pay his debts.
The pictures, the statues, the flowers, the jewels, the carriages, and the horses--inquiry proved, to my indescribable astonishment, that not a sixpence of debt was owing on any of them.
The little store of sovereigns in the tin box seemed to be the only sight that brought a faint beam of pleasure into the miller's eyes,--faint and transient, for it was soon dispelled by the thought that the time would be long--perhaps longer than his life,--before the narrow savings could remove the hateful incubus of debt.
He was weighed down by debt, his brother's family was dependent on him, he was forced to write at heart-breaking speed, and is said never to have corrected his work.