Debasement

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Debasement

The act of lowering the value of something, especially a coin. In the past, a government would melt coins down and mix them with a metal of lower value in order to create more coins of the same denomination. This inevitably caused inflation, though it is unclear how well these governments understood that. Because few currencies are now based on a precious metal, debasement it rare.
References in periodicals archive ?
Few people would undertake to debase that money because of less profit; nor would it be easy for ordinary people--and such, for the most part, are those who make counterfeit money--to maintain mints to coin similar money.
The case for renewable energy, based on a growing wind farm industry, is a sound one and groups like the Campaign for Responsible Energy Development in Tynedale should not debase this case by making hysterical and unsubstantiated claims about adverse economic effects on the tourist industry.
And thanks to George Galloway for proving that the lower you debase yourself on TV, the higher your popularity will soar.
Philip the Fair, king of France, was the first-known French king to debase money.
And he challenged: "Stop grubbing around in a desperate search for stories which only debase the discussion.
It's not just the grinning faces as they debase live prisoners and gloat over dead ones.
No one of sound mind, with a decent career, a wife and children, would debase themselves in the way he has unless there was something wrong.
I wouldn't necessarily object to a totally new British flag, but my fear is that unless we had some sort of fully functional federal Britain giving equal powers to the constituent nations and the English regions the London-based English establishment and its Celtic lackeys would soon debase it through dodgy military ventures for the vain glory of greater England.
The proposed building would debase, disfigure and destroy the character of a wonderful and world-renowned waterfront.
Under these circumstances, I wish to ask these men who want to debase silver: Would their decree apply only to mints, or would it extend also to the workshops of the silversmiths?
Conscious of these ploys, our people did not debase the quality of their gold at that time; they just increased its price.
And, finally, who will debase themselves in front of millions of viewers to win the heart of a relative stranger?