Deadhead

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Deadhead

An employee of a transportation company who travels for free in order to return home or arrive at his next assignment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Before putting your money into the jackpot for biggest fish, ask the skipper if there are any deadheads on board competing for the take.
Demand that deadheads not participate in the jackpot; if enough paying customers complain, the skipper may have a change of heart.
The ringer, an experienced angler known as a deadhead, rides for free, gets preferential treatment to enhance the odds of landing the day's whopper and hands off all the jackpot winnings - those ``friendly'' wagers of $5 or $10 per angler - to the skipper, who then divvies the cash among the deckhands.
It's a deadhead bonanza - the mother of all tourist years on party boats,'' said one prominent Orange County angler and former jackpot hustler.
And while he is never to divulge his true identity - presumably to avoid a mutiny by the paying customers - the deadhead tends to be overconfident and may even brag about his status.
Last year a boat operator from a Los Angeles County landing brazenly radioed to another party boat that his deadhead had caught a large yellowtail and he was intentionally moving off the hot spot in hopes of securing the $250 jackpot.
On a sand bass trip, Peros witnessed a Ventura County deckhand place a bagged barracuda (which, at legal size, weighs more than most bass) in the shade behind all the other bags and carefully wet it down all afternoon (so it wouldn't shrivel up and lose body weight) to improve the chances of winning the jackpot for the deadhead who boated it.
A lot of the younger Deadheads "like everything so far, but they say, 'Can't you put out something from when I was alive?
In other places, Malvinni uses the colloquial language of Deadheads rather than the precise language of music analysis.
American Speech Community, Deadheads," Journal of the Northwest Communication Association 27 [1999]: 101-20).
Much of the book is likely too technical for average rock fans and Deadheads without backgrounds in music theory, although the latter, especially, will find many passages that intuitively resonate.
The Deadhead subculture included drug use and was generally condemned by the "dominant culture" as deviant.