Breach

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Breach

A violation. For trade and legal contexts, see breach of concession agreement and breach of contract.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unfortunately, the reality is that no data breach is the same, and a wide variety of unique circumstances need to be considered in a data breach response plan," said Michael Bruemmer, vice president at Experian Data Breach Resolution.
Services, financial, technology and energy sectors have a per capita data breach cost substantially above the overall mean.
Almost one in five (17 per cent) of organisations questioned had a data breach involving the loss of more than 1,000 records in the past two years.
The survey results convinced Brightstone there is "an urgent need to correct the serious gap in data breach coverage.
When the merchants cause a data breach, they just pass along all the costs of their poor security to financial institutions.
The white noise of data breach reporting makes every breach seem just as bad as the last, but this is certainly not the case.
Several cases have failed to survive the class certification phase because plaintiffs whose personally identifiable information (PII) had been compromised couldn't prove damages or directly tie the theft of their identity to a data breach.
A tiny but motivated band of 'hacktivists' are supplanting professional criminals as the biggest single data breach threat to large enterprises, an analysis of hundreds of confirmed incident reports has found.
It also is the first data breach settlement in Hawaii.
Employees are most often the group to detect the data breach (51 percent) followed by 43 percent who say it was through an audit/assessment and 35 percent say it was as a result of a patient complaint.
The marketing firm did not have data breach insurance to cover the costs of an investigation, notification to affected customers and remediation services.
A data breach can cost an organization millions of dollars in notification expenses, public relations, legal fees, lost business--current and future--and possible lawsuits, even class action suits.