database

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database

a COMPUTER software package which enables data to be created and stored, to be retrieved and analysed later. Databases can, for example, store names and addresses of potential or past customers which can be used to produce mailing lists for SALES PROMOTIONS.
References in classic literature ?
We come now to the second ground of objection to introspection, namely, that its data do not obey the laws of physics.
We thus effect a mutual rapprochement of mind and matter, and reduce the ultimate data of introspection (in our second sense) to images alone.
And, further to tempt him, the very last chapter of Labour Tactics and Strategy remained unwritten for lack of a trifle more of essential data which he had neglected to gather.
So Freddie Drummond went down for the last time as Bill Totts, got his data, and, unfortunately, encountered Mary Condon.
His notes contain many Martian tables, and a great volume of scientific data, but since the International Astronomic Society is at present engaged in classifying, investigating, and verifying this vast fund of remarkable and valuable information, I have felt that it will add nothing to the interest of Captain Carter's story or to the sum total of human knowledge to maintain a strict adherence to the original manuscript in these matters, while it might readily confuse the reader and detract from the interest of the history.
The issue of how libraries acquire geospatial data is a prevalent one in this collection of articles.
Effective remote data management requires consideration of a variety of factors, including:
The image suggested by the term "data mining" is an attractive one, but, unfortunately, it may not be very informative to those records and information management (RIM) professionals who need to know what data mining means for them.
Accurate and timely surveillance data permit public health authorities to determine disease impacts and trends, recognize clusters and outbreaks, identify populations and geographic areas most affected, and assess the effectiveness of public health interventions (Teutsch 2000).
They're adding clinical data to improve medical and disease management programs, and also are replacing their agency, policy and claims administration systems.