corner

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Corner a Market

1. To own a significant enough amount of a stock to be able to manipulate its price. More specifically, an investor corners a market when he/she owns so many shares in a company that he/she can trigger a sell off if he/she dumps the stock. For this reason, persons and institutions owning or buying more than a certain percentage of shares in a company must register with the SEC and are subject to certain restrictions.

2. To have the greatest market share in a particular industry without having a monopoly. Companies that have cornered their markets usually have greater leeway in their decisions; for example, they may charge higher prices for their products without fear of losing too much business. Large companies, such as Wal-Mart or Microsoft, are considered to have cornered their markets. See also: Gorilla.

corner

Significant control over a sufficient portion of a particular security so that it is possible to control the security's price. Others wishing to purchase the security, especially to cover short positions, are forced to buy it at an artificially high price. Corners were popular in the early 1900s when the securities markets were virtually unregulated. See also natural corner.

corner

To acquire a big enough position in a particular security or commodity so that control over its price and supply is achieved.

corner

vb. to buy or attempt to buy up all the supplies of a particular product on the MARKET, thereby creating a temporary MONOPOLY situation with the aim of exploiting the market.
References in periodicals archive ?
They didn't plan to go as far as they did, but once they started on that slippery slope, every cut corner led to another until, pretty soon, they had to keep creating false reports or they would be found out.
He reminisces uneasily about the pressures he felt as a young stockbroker to cut corners at the expense of his clients, and in surprisingly frank terms--given his vaunted career on Wall Street--he warns investors that, for the most part, they'd be better off firing their brokers.
But what the current Wall Street scandals so obviously show is that it is the essence of the free market to cut corners, not only on ledgers, but also on environmental regulations, workplace hazards, product safety, and wages and hours.
These results, along with anecdotal evidence, leads McCabe to conclude that while the Internet is clearly a convenient tool for students already looking to cut corners, it is not necessarily fostering great numbers of "new" cheaters.
I don't want to cut corners based on what the Dow is doing any particular month," said Nichol.
Meghan Herlihy, 18, of New Canaan, Connecticut, cut corners on the clothes.
Maybe he cut corners in cutting out the competition.
A final point: If you don't cut corners in your recruiting, if you don't bring in losers to play for you, if you don't monkey with the eligibility rules, if you don't allow just anybody to help you recruit, if you keep your players out of bars, and if You keep a close check on their associations.
And if you're audited, the IRS agent working on your file will demand plenty of documents that make it clear you didn't cut corners on still other occasions.
Her staff cut corners to accommodate plaintiff's absences.
Case in point: On Saturday night you can catch We Cut Corners, Booka Brass Band, I Have A Tribe and a DJ set from the Le Galaxie boys all under the one roof, courtesy of the good folks at First Fortnight.