Cross

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Cross

Securities transaction in which the same broker acts as agent for both sides of the trade; a legal practice only if the broker first offers the securities publicly at a price higher than the bid.

Cross

To match and execute two orders made to the same broker. Suppose a broker receives one order to buy 1,000 shares at $45 and another to sell 1,000 shares at $45. If he matches these two together, he is said to cross the orders. Crossing is subject to some regulation to prevent conflict of interest on the part of the broker.

cross

To match, by a single broker or dealer, a buy order and a sell order. For example, a floor broker may have an order to buy 500 shares of IBM at $120 and another order to sell 500 shares of IBM at the same price. Subject to certain rules, the floor broker may cross the order by matching the sell and the buy orders. Crossing of stock is common in large blocks.
References in periodicals archive ?
The camera stays with the crucifix as the opening credits continue, showing first the head and outstretched arms, then withdrawing so the viewer can also see emaciated ribs.
Mokichi explains that this crucifix is the only religious image they had until he and Garupe came.
For me, my crucifix is simply about my faith nothing else.
It said the 60-year-old's religious rights had been violated by the airline when she was sent home from work for displaying a small silver crucifix during her job as an airport check-in attendant at Terminal 5 at Heathrow.
And then these X-ray pictures revealed the inch-long crucifix attached to a pink cord resting in her guts.
Bonello also brought common sense to bear: "Millions of Italian schoolchildren have, over the centuries, been exposed to the crucifix in schools.
The third novel of Benjamin Kwakye, The Other Crucifix chronicles the life of protagonist Jojo Badu.
RESIDENTS on a Middlesbrough housing estate have described their sadness at the theft of a 17th Century crucifix.
Justices with the Strasbourg, France-based court wrote, "While the crucifix was above all a religious symbol, there was no evidence before the court that the display of such a symbol on classroom walls might have an influence on pupils.
The ECHR's second verdict states that, while the crucifix is certainly a religious symbol, there is no 'evidence of the possible influence ofaa religious symbol placed on classrooms walls on students'.
A crucifix began to bleed when a woman preacher, a recent convert from Islam, prayed in her room in the morning.