court

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court

An organ of government belonging to the judicial department and charged with resolving disputes among parties.Courts generally have jurisdictional requirements providing that only certain disputes among described parties for certain amounts of money may be heard.If you file your grievance in the wrong court, you may be prejudiced when the case is dismissed for lack of jurisdiction and the time period during which to file in the proper court has expired.

References in periodicals archive ?
The example of Vanity Fair shows that the ideals of courtliness and courtly love have survived in the Victorian novel, although they are transformed and adapted to the requirements of realistic fiction.
1985 The origins of courtliness -- Civilizing trends and the formation of courtly ideals, 939-1210.
The dreamer's troubled sense of social status can be gauged by the fact that, when faced with what he hears as the resolute courtliness of the maiden, he feels himself to be inferior to his own social class.
Like the court ballets of the European royal courts -notably the Sun King and Versailles -kathak dancing is characterised by its courtliness with an emphasis on fast and intricate footwork, contrasting passages of stillness with sudden fast-flowing movement.
This text is familiar to New Historicism as exemplary of the courtliness of Renaissance literary production in general, and in particular of the literary text's thematization of its own courtly negotiations.
Mahdaviani's playfully intricate partnering and her exuberant reading of the music turned courtliness on its ear--and then still continued romping.
Jean Campbell, Butler, Calvillo, and Fiorenza, courtliness could be expressed in a particular type of very learned, often antiquarian visual style, full of references to classical models, that emerged through the opportunity for living and working in close proximity to poets and intellectuals who were also jostling for position in the ambit of the court.
The performers are not afraid to drive the music hard where appropriate, as in the finale to the E major Concerto, almost impatient with the courtliness of its minuet context; there is no silky blandness in these readings, even though the accompanying orchestra is the renownedly suave Berlin Philharmonic.
David Burnley, Courtliness and Literature in Medieval England, Longman Medieval and Renaissance Library (London: Longman, 1998).
By focusing on the formation of anti-aristocratic attitudes and anti-courtly aesthetics, Huntington provides valuable supplements to the work of Daniel Javitch (Poetry and Courtliness in Renaissance England [1978]) and Frank Whigham (Ambition and Privilege: The Social Tropes of Elizabethan Courtesy Theory [1984]).
Cosimo's early outreach contrasts with the far more self-interested courtliness described by Castiglione in The Book of the Courtier: "[Federico], among the other praiseworthy things he did, on the harsh site of Urbino built a palace, according to the opinion of many the most beautiful to be found in Italy; and he furnished it so well with every necessary thing that it did not seem to be a palace, but a city in the form of a palace.
48) This combination of courtliness and beauty might seem the perfection of Florentine Trecento womanhood.