Counterposing

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Counterposing

A slang term for the practice of an employee avoiding work by using jargon or vague statements to confuse and outsmart management.
References in periodicals archive ?
Himes specifically counterposes this idea of a planned incident by a martyr to what he sees as more random, spontaneous rioting, which he condemns as ineffectual and based in self-interest, as opposed to race betterment.
Shapira falsely counterposes settlement ("by virtue of labor") to force ("by dint of conquest").
To the vast scale of Buttynsky's imagery--ship-breaking yards, wastelands of strip mines, and the remnants of uranium tailings--Brandenburg counterposes a smaller one.
Achcar counterposes the realpolitik indicated in this speech, where the idealized realm of global peace is at least perceived as a promise, to the contemporary post-September 11 context.
Ward helpfully counterposes the league's dependence on traditional, fairly conservative Catholic family theology and its strong challenge to the male-dominated medical profession.
Waldman counterposes the policy machinations with the Monica machinations in a successful bit of novelistic gimmickry.
In the first composition of the present collection, the author establishes comparisons between the banks of a river and the gradual running-down experiences in life, to which he counterposes his concept of the meaning of life: namely, "the subaquatic currents on the fragile dividing line between the ephemeral and the eternal.
This emphasis on discourse involves a problematic notion of Shakespearean drama in general, which it is Berger's purpose to develop in the light of his apparent distaste for performance-centered criticism, and against which he counterposes a strongly text-centered criticism.
With a soundtrack that counterposes children's colloquialisms with the voice-over or image of an adult man, the film layers fragments of the past upon the present, often frustrating the spectator in doing so.
Haacke ironically counterposes Philip Morris's art statements with a photo of Jesse Helms, anti-art crusader, whom Philip Morris also generously supports.
Thus, in her novel, Malinow counterposes a feminine aqueous mode, a type of corporal ink, against a Hispanic masculine world composed of words, that, ironically, instead of delivering a presence of person or object, always postpone true contact.