Overrun

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Overrun

In the context of project financing, the amount of capital expenditures or funding above the original estimate to complete the project.

Overrun

The amount by which the actual cost of a project exceeds its budget. While this does not necessarily guarantee that the project will fail, it does make it more difficult to succeed. This is also called cost overrun or budget overrun.
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, at the 37 percent completion point, the A-12 contractors reported a cost overrun of $459 million and a projected cost overrun at completion of $354 million (Campbell & Fleming, 1991).
However, no details are provided on how far losses could mount over and above the current nearly $1 billion cost overrun total.
Despite being privately owned by the Duke, Grosvenor tries to match quoted company standards when publishing its annual report and accounts, meaning news about the cost overruns was bound to come out.
The project will be funded without the knowledge of the contractor's project cost-overrun percentage history and the potential unknowns surrounding project cost overrun.
In 1990, the full-scale development contract experienced significant cost overruns.
To date, cost overruns are primarily a result of a lack of purchasing power parity.
The huge cost overrun left the city with a $14 million shortfall that will have to be made up by looting the public treasury.
Most of the project's cost overrun has been due to delays mainly caused by difficulties in driving piles into the river bed, he said.
The Los Angeles lawmaker also said he wanted to know why lawmakers were kept in the dark about the cost overrun.
0 million) through a combination of new equity, capital cost overrun guarantees and subordinated debt.
6 billion cost overrun on the International Space Station.
After 3 years of lawsuits and nearly $2 billion in cost overruns on the country's first nuclear construction projects in 30 years, Westinghouse Electric Co.