corporeal

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corporeal

Tangible real or personal property; things you can touch. Contrast with incorporeal property such as easements (a right to use, but not a right to, property) and goodwill.

References in periodicals archive ?
For Rawls, those traumas and harms, desires and (sometimes) fulfillments that corporeally constitute us as people still do not constitute us as the relevant persons of polity.
the woman is inveigled into substantiating two realities corporeally.
It demands that one imagine a shared and naive universality, for the plastic arts "presents concepts of things corporeally, as they might exist in nature" (186).
Scientifically, they are vast sources of information about our molecular environment (energy-transfer); corporeally, we need them in order to entrain the body to the ambient environment (movement); orally, they can be employed for practical ends (speech); artistically, they can be employed for aesthetic purposes (music).
Lara corporeally reinscribes the scene prior to Agustin's crime, when Edwina was mailing a soup, perhaps as an initiation rite both commemorative and preparatory to an internal voyage.
Bigger thinks that by killing Bessie (whom he has already tried to corporeally equate with Mary), he has achieved the freedom he previously imagined existing only in the movie theater.
At the MCA, it was therefore impossible not to perceive Adjaye's airy, light-infused building anew--to experience the space in a corporeally different way and to recalibrate how the building's features interrelate.
In other words, what this dramatist achieves is to show June her "after," to which neither she (nor, by extension, we) has any access corporeally.
Twelve years later, in 1968, when the star's musical career was in the doldrums, his manager once again exploited the medium of TV to bring his star corporeally to his audience.
One can then claim that the historical field is recognized by the interchanging functions as analogous to one another, capable of filling in one another, and equally by the facts as systems, not revealing essentialities, as was shown at the outset, but various analogical interconnections, recognizable corporeally.
Having never met a metaphor that he did not wish to literalize, he equates the "Fore-skinne" of the poet's "phansie" with the poet's own foreskin, and suggests that Donne's passionately erotic verses have "evoked an answering passion in Browne: a poetic, textualized, d passion to have Donne and to have all of Donne, a passion corporeally figured through the image of a complete full-length, uncircumcised 'phansie' that stands so prominently in the middle of the first stanza" (44).