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Copyright

The right to distribute, copy, or change an original work for a limited period of time. A state grants copyright to the creator of the work, but the creator may assign or sell the right. During the time the copyright persists, one must (with some exceptions) receive permission from the owner to publish or distribute the copyrighted material. After a certain period of time, any person may distribute the work without permission. See also: Public domain.

copyright

the legal ownership by persons or businesses of certain kinds of material, in particular original literary, dramatic, musical and artistic work; sound recordings, films, broadcasts and cable programmes; the typographical arrangement or layout of a published edition; and computer programs. In the UK, the COPYRIGHT, DESIGNS AND PATENTS ACT 1988 gives legal rights to the creators of copyright material so that they can control the various ways in which their work may be exploited. Copyright protection is automatic and there is no registration or other formality The 1988 Act gives copyright owners protection against unauthorized copying of such material in most cases for a period of 50 years. If copyright is infringed, the copyright owner (or assignee or licensee) may seek an injunction through the courts preventing further abuses, with offenders liable to pay unlimited damages/ fines and prison sentences in extreme cases. See BRAND.

copyright

the ownership of the rights to a publication of a book, manual, newspaper, etc., giving legal entitlement and powers of redress against theft and unauthorized publication or copying. See INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHT.

Copyright

The exclusive legal right to sell, reproduce, or publish a literary, musical, or artistic work.
References in periodicals archive ?
The scientific and engineering community depends for its research on copyrighted works such as software, books, journals, educational films and databases, all of which are affected by copyright regulations.
In that law Congress for the first time had specified factors for courts to consider in determining fair use: the nature and purpose (commercial or noncommercial) of the infringing work; the nature of the copyrighted work; the amount and substantiality of the copied portion in relation to the whole; and the effect of the infringing work upon the potential market for, or value of, the copyrighted work.
Thus, the owner of a copyrighted Web page could attach charges or restrictions to the use of his/her work by a library, even if the library's use was under fair use.
861-18(c)(2)(i)-(iv) are transferred to the buyer, thereby making the transaction a transfer of a copyrighted article under Regs.
These tactics are coercive in nature, and every business that uses music, copyrighted or not, is going to be subjected to their heavy-handed tactics until the law is changed.
If one of the four rights is not transferred and the transaction does not involve, or involves to only a de minimis extent, the provision of services or know-how, the transaction will be classified solely as the transfer of a copyrighted article.
The Green Paper states that "it is critical that researchers, students and other members of the public have on-line equivalent to their current opportunities off-line to browse through copyrighted works in their schools and public libraries" (Intellectual Property and the National Information Infrastructure, 1994, p.
Booker forwarded copies of his copyrighted designs and sales promotional materials to the Detroit Pistons since one of his copyrighted designs was specifically geared to the Pistons team.
And many of them-especially those who have been developing their own DRM technologies-want to see a world in which copyrighted works are reasonably well-protected.
Copyrights on several of Disney's earliest, pre-Mickey Mouse cartoons - films such as ``Puss 'n Boots,'' ``Alice's Wonderland'' and ``Cinderella'' - expired last year or will expire this year, 75 years after they were first copyrighted.
Judge Leval ruled in a 67-page decision that profit-making companies such as Texaco cannot photocopy copyrighted journal articles without obtaining permission from and compensating the copyright holders.
Instead, it's ordinary citizens, whose use of new technology to trade copies of copyrighted works-such as songs reduced to MP3 files-not only makes those works easier for foreign and domestic commercial infringers to find, copy, and sell, but also may have a commercial impact all by itself, as Internet users cease buying new CDs and other copyrighted products.