affidavit

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Affidavit

A statement sworn to be true to the best of the maker's knowledge. An affidavit is notarized to prove its authenticity. A person who knowingly makes a false statement in an affidavit is guilty of perjury.

affidavit

A written statement signed by the person making the statement—the affiant—and sworn to as true and accurate.
References in classic literature ?
The contents of her last note to him were these:-- "What am I to imagine, Willoughby, by your behaviour last night?
Nevertheless, if such be your least offer, I must be content.
At sight of the contents, he uttered one loud sob of such immense relief that I sat petrified.
As I passed through the noisy throng, which by this time completely environed the Ti, I looked with fearful curiosity at the three packages, which now were deposited upon the ground; but although I had no doubt as to their contents, still their thick coverings prevented my actually detecting the form of a human body.
But he was content that imagination should work, for out of it might come some solution of the mystery which surrounded him.
The following morning Abdul Mourak was enraged and chagrined to discover that this huge, black prisoner had escaped during the night, while Werper was terrified for the same reason, until his trembling fingers discovered the pouch still in its place beneath his shirt, and within it the hard outlines of its contents.
Monty drank off the contents of the tumbler in two long, delicious gulps
Every psychical phenomenon is characterized by what the scholastics of the Middle Ages called the intentional (also the mental) inexistence of an object, and what we, although with not quite unambiguous expressions, would call relation to a content, direction towards an object (which is not here to be understood as a reality), or immanent objectivity.
And as experience shows, many have been the conspiracies, but few have been successful; because he who conspires cannot act alone, nor can he take a companion except from those whom he believes to be malcontents, and as soon as you have opened your mind to a malcontent you have given him the material with which to content himself, for by denouncing you he can look for every advantage; so that, seeing the gain from this course to be assured, and seeing the other to be doubtful and full of dangers, he must be a very rare friend, or a thoroughly obstinate enemy of the prince, to keep faith with you.
It was unsatisfactory, and I could not imagine that she would be content with me; I was not content with myself.
In the first case, if inevitability were possible without freedom we should have reached a definition of inevitability by the laws of inevitability itself, that is, a mere form without content.
My father, at any rate, had such a decided bent in the direction of literature, that he was not content in any of his several economical experiments till he became the editor of a newspaper, which was then the sole means of satisfying a literary passion.