CHF

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CHF

The ISO 4217 currency code for Swiss Franc.

CHF

ISO 4217 code for the Swiss franc. Although the first Swiss franc was used briefly at the end of the 18th century, the modern franc was introduced in 1850, replacing almost two dozen local currencies. Switzerland was a member of the Latin Monetary Union until its demise in 1927 and later belonged to the Bretton Woods System. Until 2000, at least 40% of the franc was required to be backed by gold. The Swiss franc is known for having almost no inflation and as such is considered a very safe currency for investment.
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Cardiome has three late stage clinical drug programs focused on atrial arrhythmias, congestive heart failure, and hyperuricemia (gout).
The report recognizes the following companies as the key players in the Global Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) Drugs Market: AstraZeneca plc, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co.
Comprehensive access to over 25 actual congestive heart failure deals entered into by the world's biopharma companies since 2007
Figure 1-1: Incidence of Congestive Heart Failure Cases in the Major World
For more information about the Scios-sponsored Harris Interactive survey of congestive heart failure patients, or to obtain a copy of the study, contact Karin Bauer Aranaz at WeissCom Partners, 415-362-5018.
Acute congestive heart failure affects more than 700,000 people in the United States annually.
Congestive Heart Failure Device Markets provides an overview of alternate treatment options in the U.
Human BNP was discovered by Scios researchers and has shown potential as a treatment for acute congestive heart failure.
MiCardia is an emerging company developing a novel technology for the minimally invasive and non-invasive adjustable cardiovascular implants for the treatment of various stages of Congestive Heart Failure ("CHF").
Johnson, a congestive heart failure patient, was well aware before he had the "heart wrap" operation that it was a risky and experimental procedure, but he and his cardiologist, Mariell Jessup, M.
He holds an appointment as assistant professor at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine, and has performed research and published extensively on topics related to chronic disease and congestive heart failure outcomes.