condemnor


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Related to condemnor: condemner

condemnor

One who condemns property.

References in periodicals archive ?
Condemnation blight generally refers to the detrimental impact on property caused by the threat of condemnation or by delays between the time the condemnor announces a proposed acquisition and the time the actual taking occurs.
Condemnees usually favor income capitalization, gross rent multipliers, and sales comparison whereas condemnors usually prefer the cost approach, arguing that the application of other approaches may taint the just compensation evidence by inappropriate inclusion of business value, or by failure to recognize the short-term nature of a site lease, or both.
The court noted that in Virginia, structures attached by a lessee to condemned real estate are per se deemed to be realty as between the condemnor and the lessee, ensuring they are included in the initial valuation of the property as a whole.
FIGURE 6 Differences Between Severance and Consequential Damages Severance Damages Consequential Damages Directly linked to partial Linked to whole property, taking property rights not taken Value of the remainder Value of the entire is decreased property is decreased Statutory remedy Common-law remedy Compensable under Damages under inverse condemnation condemnation Suit filed by condemnor, Suit filed by claimant if the owner disagrees (owner) to obtain re- with the amount of covery for the compensation offered damages Examples: Landlocked, Examples: Relocation of irregular shape, small a road, change in parcels, excessive zoning, off and on slope flooding due to highway way embarkment, elevation of street
This obviously does not leave the condemnor very happy.
If ghe condemnor were to proceed on the total take basis, however, the court would be far less likely to award the in personam losses as well as the before-market value, because no such precedent has been established.
As noted, some states permit the condemnor to take possession of the property upon depositing funds in the amount of the taking while litigation continues.
Kelo indicates that the public use requirement would not be met if the condemnor had an impermissible purpose of transferring property for purely private benefit.
However, in cases when the temporary taking is a construction easement, the North Carolina Supreme Court has held that the condemnor is also liable for additional damages flowing from the use of the temporary construction easement, including changes made in the area resulting from the use of the easement that affect the value of the remaining property.
For instance, you can require the condemning authority (condemnor) to meet with an independent mediator who can force the condemnor to pay for a second appraisal if there are concerns with the first.
fail, then the condemnor must file a complaint in the appropriate court,