Competence

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Competence

Sufficient ability or fitness for one's needs. The necessary abilities to be qualified to achieve a certain goal or complete a project.

Competence

The ability to complete a project, make a product, or otherwise do what is required. Both individuals and companies have competence. For example, an engineer would not likely find a job as a nurse because it is outside his competence, that is, his ability to do the required work. Likewise, a dental office is unlikely to be hired to design a skyscraper.
References in periodicals archive ?
The competency revalidation process included expertise from across the Department.
In view of its importance and potential, many global and domestic organizations are using and applying competency based technique to combine the strengths of different employees to produce the highest quality work.
Plenty of states have seen the virtue of the competency approach, so they're offering it as an option to districts.
The competency model can help a medical writing organization define its title structure and align the skills needed for each role.
A competency approach to human resource management and academic curriculum development can be a useful framework for building organizational capacity and ensuring academic program relevancy.
After competencies identifying and defining should be the created competency models for various work positions.
The book proffers learning of the concepts of competency and its context, the process of competency mapping and its different aspects.
Sahoo, which covers various dimensions of competency mapping processes including developing a competency model for the organization, identification of competencies, assessment of competencies and the implementation of competency mapping process.
Strategic competency management starts with setting-up of "competency development unit" and its scope/ impact applies to most positions across the organisation.
More recently and in response to the economic, political, technological, and environmental changes being brought about by globalization, the importance of internationally-attuned education has taken on renewed vitality as is evidenced by the global competency initiative issued by the Council on International Education Exchange in 1988 (Council on the International Educational Exchange [CIEE], 1988).
The public health core competencies are organized in two levels: domain and competency.

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