Commons

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Commons

Real estate, especially open space, that belongs to a community as a whole. Regulations governing how commons may be used (for example, how they may be used for commerce) vary by jurisdiction.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Society has submitted an objection to Gwynedd County Council and has called on it to ensure the developer, London-based The Quarry Battery Co Ltd, is aware that works cannot be built on common land without the consent of the environment minister, in addition to any planning permission.
Common land is vital to farming, particularly in upland areas, as well as being greatly valued for its heritage, the recreation it provides, and as a source of treasured green space.
We are dismayed there is no mention of common land in the documents accompanying the application," she said.
It allows for correction of the common land registers, the establishment of commons councils to secure good management of the land, and an improved consent-process for works on common land.
Certain types of land will not be subject to the new access rights, even if qualifying as open country or registered common land.
He revealed that more than 100 Glastir Commons agreements were issued involving 947 active graziers during 2011-12 - equating to 67,500 hectares of common land.
Uplands commons account for 8% of Wales land mass, and each year some 18% of Welsh farmers declare common land on their Single Application Forms.
Over the past 300 years by force and legal deceit the commons have been enclosed until areas of common land such as that at Clayton Fields is a jewel to be preserved.
The underground tips have often been filled in and turned in to common land.
Were any other Birmingham parks or areas of common land used for this purpose during the food shortages in or immediately following the war?
A public inquiry is to be held after a council announced plans to allow a patch of common land to be used as a car park.
By the middle of the 19th century there was a danger that all Britain's common land would disappear with the rapid spread of enclosures.