Commoditization

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Commoditization

Movement toward perfect competition; the process by which a good or service thought to be unique or superior becomes like other, similar goods and services in the eyes of the market. Commoditization is the movement toward undifferentiated competition between two or more companies offering the same good or service. This leads to lower prices.
References in periodicals archive ?
As Ugandan academic Mahmood Mamdani noted, the commodification and marketisation of land works in favour of those who can afford to purchase land, but of the poor peasant?
The initiative, titled, "Not by Commodification Your Product Sells," launched Thursday by the advocacy organization Fe-Male, with support from IndyAct, is a one-month online campaign created to reveal gender discrimination propagated by media and advertisers to sell more products, a process that the group said promotes gender violence by sexually objectifying women.
This commodification of human organs, tissues or parts has led to the exploitation of persons living in poverty and the uneducated, especially from the developing countries, who would readily sell for easy big money," Relampagos said.
In a meeting chaired by cabinet secretary Ajit Seth on January 23, I& B secretary Uday Verma spotlighted the indecent portrayal and commodification of women in the media, documents in possession of MAIL TODAY show.
He is notable, rather, for his insight into the abstraction, hollowness, and deadness that commodification introduces into human relations.
This presentation is anchored majorly on the commodification hypothesis within the popular or mass culture theories and fashionalism.
While the colours lack depth, their one dimensionality is offset by their textural material existence as a literal mass of colour--a mass bound together by allusion to commodification of society's basic building blocks.
remarkably well onto philosophical discussions of commodification as
I]t is helpful to focus not on the commodity in itself but rather on the commodification process.
But in Under Kilimanjaro, his critique of the rampant commodification of the African landscape and the experience of travel is tied into a very intimate critique of the commodification of his own image.
Among their topics are commodification versus solidarity, US health care reform and the Stockholm syndrome, the marketization of health care in Europe, maternal mortality in Africa, health care as soap opera on medical television dramas, Cuban health politics at home and abroad, the shaping of global health policy, learning from the HIV/AIDS mobilizations about building a comprehensive public health movement, and mental health in a sick society.
It starts by identifying four distinct ways in which tax and commodification.