Club

(redirected from clubs)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Club

A group of underwriters who do not need to proceed to form a syndicate.
References in classic literature ?
At such times clubs would be used, often with the effect of killing or stunning the flying pests.
Highcamp called to ask her to go with them to the Jockey Club to witness the turf event of the season.
Arms, gleaming knives, and formidable clubs, appeared above them, but the blows were evidently given at random.
Was the tribe inhabiting the Isle of Thanet of a ferocious disposition, I wonder, and ready to fall with stone-studded clubs and wooden lances hardened in the fire, upon the backs of unwary mariners?
However, I believe that is quite a common occurrence nowadays and that they have to take in extra copies of THE TIMES at all the clubs in St.
It broke in wild yells, and a rush up the street of men and women, waving clubs and bamboos and sickles and knives.
There was a sort of international financier, a fellow with an Italian name, a shady personality, who had been looking for her all over Europe and talked in clubs - astonishing how such fellows get into the best clubs - oh
The greatest portion, however -- those especially who belabor the populace with clubs -- are the principal courtiers of the palace, executing as in duty bound, some laudable comicality of the king's.
A wild shrill clamor rose from the edge of the wood and suddenly a body of ape-men rushed out with clubs and stones, and made for the center of the Indian line.
He was a man of excellent birth and education, who had squandered a fortune upon the turf, and who lived now by doing a little quiet and genteel book-making in the sporting clubs of London.
In men's clubs such celebrations were, though expiring, less uncommon; but either the natural shyness of the softer sex, or a sarcastic attitude on the part of male relatives, had denuded such women's clubs as remained (if any other did) or this their glory and consummation.
If, by any extraordinary chance, there was no war going, then they got up a deadly family feud with the next-door neighbor, and if, in spite of this, they still had a few spare moments on their hands, they occupied them with discussions as to whose sweetheart was the best looking, the arguments employed on both sides being battle-axes, clubs, etc.