client

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client

a BUYER of a professional SERVICE.

client

The person to whom an agent owes duties of integrity, confidentiality, loyalty, and hard work. Contrast with customer, who is owed the duty of honesty.

References in periodicals archive ?
Consequently, the result may be less in gains for the society as a whole than as a mechanism allowing the ruling elite to target construction projects to chosen locales within the state strengthening a clientage political order as well as the interests of the regime in maintaining clientage relationships.
Even in the Highlands it was also probably weakening: Alison Cathcart argues that "by the late fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries blood kinship was no longer the principal organising feature of clan society but rather one of a number of factors which contributed to the formation of clannish relationships": Cathcart, Kinship and Clientage, p.
On the other hand, in the opening lines of Epistle 1, Horace addresses Maecenas and refers to his clientage by utilising a metaphor drawn from the career of a slave, a gladiator (1.
Then, when it came to his confrontation with al-Muwaffaq, Ibn Tulun had no previous links of clientage or exchange of benefits with this adversary.
ISLAMABAD, July 11 -- Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Engineering Development Board (EDB), Iqbal Ahmed underlined the need of evolving a monitoring system in the Board for determining priority areas for satisfying clientage.
Drawing attention to "the mixture of clientage and bribery, threats of expropriation and grants of political access and political friendship that typifies minority-majority relations on most of [the] continent" (Coovadia 2009), Coovadia dissects Indians' ability to fit between the seams of discord, irritate all sides of a conflict, and become the necessary criminal element that helps forge bonds within such 'in-between' societies.
The overclass-underclass alliance, he said, had seized on a new strategy for strengthening itself: the importation of massive underclass reinforcements via unrestricted immigration of poor, unskilled Third Worlders from regions of low civilizational achievement--people bound to end up on the elites' clientage rolls in perpetuity.
Even McLean's final conclusion that the process of network building, of creating patronage ties "was a game that made Florentines into something like us, having been something unlike us previously" (229, emphasis McLean's) bears a resemblance to the thesis most often associated with Giorgio Chittolini: that the development of modernity, and the modern state in particular, owed a great deal to practices and behaviors that to twenty-first century eyes appear negative or regressive--nepotism, paternalism, institutionalized corruption, and, especially, patronage and clientage.
One of the things that strikes one reading these diaries is the predominance in the Blair years of courtier-like politics redolent of the baroque court of Louis XIV with its patronage and clientage.
Urban refugees from different ethnic groups did not have the resources, such as political clientage traditions, agricultural knowledge, and labour power, to negotiate with these actors and did not want to, and therefore addressed themselves to international actors and the state for aid by establishing a "spontaneous camp" in Thuo town.
These kleptocrats throw themselves at the feet of Western plutocracies: they spurn the real source of power -- their own people -- seeking clientage under Western boots.
As participants in clientage, Cassiano--and in turn Poussin--as clients themselves, each owed their patron something in exchange for advancement and protection.