Class action

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Related to class-action: Class action lawsuit, Class action status, Class Action Suits

Class action

A legal complaint filed by a lawyer or group of lawyers for a group of petitioners with an identical grievance, often with an award proportionate to the number of shareholders involved.

Class Action Lawsuit

A lawsuit that occurs when multiple people, who claim to have been wronged by the defendant in the same or a similar way, seek restitution, even if the alleged wrongs occurred at different times. For example, multiple shareholders may file a class action suit against a company if they suffered losses from similar fraudulent actions. Proponents of class actions lawsuits contend that they allow "the little guy," however defined, to seek justice. Opponents argue that they enrich attorneys and do not necessarily help the actual plaintiffs. See also: Tort reform, Class Action Fairness Act of 2005.
References in periodicals archive ?
The fact is that historically, such class-actions have played a critical role in shaping special-education policy.
Such ideas aren't likely to be popular with the class-action lawyers, unless they remember that they're supposed to be the ones looking out for consumers.
Fixing the class-action system, however, is a bit more straightforward: Remove the incentives for abuse.
Once considered a key to the courthouse door, the class-action system has been perverted into the class-action lawyers' key to the legal lottery.
Companies are anxious to settle because a class-action suit is so onerous and costly, even though most class members know very little about the case that has their names on it, said Lawrence Schonbrun, a Berkeley attorney.
Among the issues the judiciary is considering are broad reforms that could raise the bar on giving lawsuits the class-action designation.
The judiciary's study comes on the heels of other actions designed to reform the class-action system.
For the first time in 30 years, the conference is reviewing court rules for class-action lawsuits.
The agency ruled that the company held no monopoly, but the publicity generated a slew of class-action antitrust suits, filed by lawyers on behalf of thousands of unnamed ticket buyers.
If it's not a shareholder winding up with pennies in a settlement or a corporate chief who spends millions to defend the suits, then it's a politician who is complaining about class-action lawsuits.
Originally designed to give average Americans some muscle when taking on corporate titans, class-action suits are angering many inside and outside the legal community.