encryption

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Encryption

The coding of sensitive information for transfer online or otherwise electronically. One may encrypt data to prevent anyone other than the intended recipient from accessing it. For example, if one buys a product online and enters credit card information into an electronic form, that information is usually encrypted so hackers and potential identity thieves cannot use it for illicit purposes.

encryption

The manipulation of data to prevent accurate interpretation by all but those for whom the data is intended. Financial institutions use encryption to increase the security of data transmitted via the Internet.
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In cyptography, block cipher algorithms are used to encrypt a message or block of plaintext with a fixed-length [1].
Design of Stream Ciphers, " Communication Systems Security, pp.
Using this cipher, Caesar might have written the following message.
Lipson, consist of two polyalphabetic ciphers and two matrix ciphers.
Correlation Attack: Good nonlinearity characteristics does not imply correlation immunity, ie, good nonlinear ciphers can display correlations among key, plain-texts and cipher-texts, which is the basis of correlation attack.
But Al Mazroui said his cipher, which he called Abu Dhabi Code, was based on a group of symbols he said he designed himself.
3 Visual security assessment for several cipher videos
The 128-bit block ciphers, AES, Camellia, and SEED, are the only ciphers adopted as the next generation standard.
Ciphers involve the replacement of true letters or numbers (plain text) with different characters (cipher text) or the systematic rearrangement of the true letters without changing their identities to form an enciphered message.
One more tip: When you turn your message into a cipher, ignore the punctuation marks and spaces between words.
The Ciphers are the first international standard encryption algorithms selected by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC).
Not all SSL ciphers protect data equally and many IT organizations have not improved their SSL quality despite the availability of higher standards.