CFC

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Related to chlorofluorocarbon: global warming

CFC

Controlled Foreign Corporation

A company registered in and regulated by a foreign country that has at least 50% American ownership. Setting up a corporation in a foreign country may have tax advantages; for example, a country may encourage companies to register in it by having no corporate tax. The IRS works within the context of foreign treaties to determine how earnings from controlled foreign corporations are taxed in the United States.
References in periodicals archive ?
The typical air-conditioned car carries two to three pounds of chlorofluorocarbons as a refrigerant, commonly called R12.
Pollutants, especially chlorofluorocarbons, bind strongly to cold surfaces.
15 to 17, also marked the 10th anniversary of the original international treaty to phase out ozone-destroying chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs).
Commonly known as CFCs, chlorofluorocarbons are the coolant material essential to many air conditioning systems in use today.
Chlorofluorocarbons and other pollutants in the atmosphere attack ozone molecules around the globe, wreaking the greatest havoc near the poles, where air temperatures are lowest.
won for its 10-year development of a process to make sheets of polystyrene foam that employs carbon dioxide instead of hydrocarbons or ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs).
Although almost one-quarter could explain correctly how chlorofluorocarbons were believed to contribute to the thinning of stratospheric ozone, only about half of these adults could describe reasonably well where in the atmosphere this thinning is taking place.
The propellants used in traditional MDI's are chlorofluorocarbons (CFC's).
manufacturers ceased production of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) for domestic consumption in all but a few "essential" uses, such as rocket motor manufacturing.
17, 1998--The United States Environmental Protection Agency announced today that it has filed Administrative Complaints against seven companies in the Southeast as part of a nationwide enforcement initiative under the Federal Clean Air Act as it pertains to the use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs).
The protocol and its subsequent amendments are gradually weaning the world from a half century of reliance on chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and other halocarbons.
An EPA Administrative Penalty Order alleged that the company failed to use certified technicians and failed to use proper recycling or recovery equipment when handling refrigerants containing chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs).