Child

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Child

For tax purposes, the term child includes the taxpayer's son, duaghter, stepchild, eligible foster child, or a descedant of any of them, or an adopted child. It also includes the taxpayer's brother, sister, half brother, half sister, stepbrother, stepsister, or a descendant of any of them.
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understand that poverty forces many children around the world to perform hard labor in dangerous conditions.
While not using the word "'self-regulation" to describe higher mental functions, Vygotsky described them though as deliberate, intentional, or volitional behaviors, as something that humans have control of Acquiring higher mental functions allows children to make a critical transition from being "slaves to the environment" to becoming "masters of their own behavior".
Teachers and parents swear by the child-parent center program, and researchers have documented that the centers' preschool students fare better as young adults than children who do not attend.
Not all children with special needs enter the educational system already identified as having a disability.
Ram & Hou (2003) found in a recent study that "[compared] with children in families with two original parents, those in lone-parent and stepparent families are at a disadvantage on every measure of child outcome, even when their initial disadvantages and socioeconomic background are taken into account" (p.
With eight to fifteen pairs of children and caregivers (and often older siblings, friends, and relatives) and one librarian, there were a large number of participants to keep track of at any one time.
Previous studies have shown a benefit of the targeted TST in children (11-13).
It is estimated that between 9% and 15% of all children in the United States have a disability; approximately 175,000 to 300,000 children with disabilities in this country are maltreated each year.
The NCS is a prospective epidemiologic study that will follow 100,000 children--a statistically representative sample of all children born in the United States--from (or before) conception to 21 years of age.
Children in Latin America continue to utilize kinship and family relations in creative and adaptive ways even as they interact ever more strongly with the globalized economy.
For children living in single-parent families, where the parent studied or worked, 85 per cent of them attended some sort of child care in 2000/01 as opposed to 78 per cent of them six years earlier, while 73 per cent of children of two-parent families, where the parents worked or studied, were in child care in 2000/01 as opposed to 66 per cent in 1994/95.

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