chart


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Graph

A representation of numbers signifying different data sets. Graphs are vitally important in tracking past performance of economic data with the aim of predicting its future behavior. For example, a government agency may create a graph of unemployment claims over time. If claims have trended downward, the agency may predict that unemployment may remain low. Graphs are also crucial for technical analysts, who use them to track securities' performance to help make investment decisions. Graphs are also known as charts.

chart

Data displayed in a diagrammatic manner, often to show relationships between different sets of numbers. Charts are used to observe the historical values of variables and, frequently, to spot trends that may provide insights for use in projecting future values. Also called graph. See also bar chart, candlestick chart, line chart, point-and-figure chart.
References in periodicals archive ?
If you want to change its location after you have placed the chart on the data sheet, right-click inside the chart once and then click on Location from the menu.
You also can add data points for emphasis along the chart lines (exhibit 8, at left).
While we tend to think that just the X chart is important, the R chart also gives good information.
For instance, if you have been analyzing your causes of scrap, you can make up another type of chart, called a Pareto chart.
Chart 19: GROSS ADDITIONS GROWTH BY OPERATOR (YoY) -
Chart 28: VOICE REVENUE PER MINUTE GROWTH BY OPERATOR (YoY) -
This hides the first data series--the start dates--making the chart resemble a Gantt chart.
Exhibit 2 shows the completed chart after some touch-up work.
On the other hand, X-bar and R charts could be kept for each individual cavity.
The R chart shows that one range was above the UCL on August 2.
Data display methods include x-y plotting, logarithmic plots, and vertical strip charts.