Impairment

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Impairment

Reduction in the value of an asset because the asset no longer generates the benefits expected earlier as determined by the company through periodic assessments. This could happen because of changes in market value of the asset, business environment, government regulations, etc.

Impairment

A reduction in a company's working capital as a result of a loss on an investment or a distribution (such as a coupon or dividend) to investors.

impairment

Reduction in a firm's capital as a result of distributions or losses.
References in periodicals archive ?
Damien Heaton and Lily Cunningham say their lives were turned upside down when 16-month-old son Patrick Heaton was diagnosed with cerebral visual impairment (CVI).
This ambitious book links the work of authors from many of the major research teams in this field, who have made significant contributions to the literature on the subject of cerebral visual impairment and provide a structured amalgam of the viewpoints of different specialists.
Together they have been awarded a grant worth around Au130,000 for a Knowledge Transfer Partnership (KTP) which will apply the very latest research in visual neuroscience to the rehabilitation of childhood cerebral visual impairment and special education.
Abstract: This longitudinal case study presents John's journey through childhood and adolescence, living with visual difficulties associated with a cerebral visual impairment.
Several years ago, the European branch of the International Council for Education and Rehabilitation of People with Visual Impairment (ICEVI-Europe) recognized the need for professional training in the areas of ocular and cerebral visual impairment.
At the very least, this should help motivate teachers of students with visual impairments and O&M specialists to continue developing intervention and habilitation strategies for children with cortical or cerebral visual impairment (CVI) and find ways to interface with other education, rehabilitation, and medical team members.
The first is a response by Gordon Dutton to the letter written by James Jan that was published in February 2011 on the use of the term cortical visual impairment versus cerebral visual impairment.
Jan (2011), in the February issue of this journal, provided cogent reasons why the term cerebral visual impairment should not be used as a replacement for cortical visual impairment.
Stimulated by commentary included in the October 2010 Special Issue on Vision and the Brain, James Jan, a preeminent ophthalmologist and scientist, questions the use of the terms cerebral visual impairment and cortical visual impairment (CVI).
This group felt that cerebral visual impairment was a more appropriate term than cortical visual impairment (both terms were abbreviated as CVI).
In North America, CVI is often interpreted as cortical visual impairment; elsewhere, the term cerebral visual impairment is used.