centralization

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centralization

the vertical dimension of ORGANIZATION structure. Organizations are centralized when important decisions are largely taken by managers at the top of the organization. There is a persistent tension between DECENTRALIZATION and centralization organizations. Centralization of decisions is useful to provide central direction to the organization. However, it can mean that the organization cannot respond quickly to PRODUCT MARKET developments. Also, if lower level managers are precluded from making important decisions it can have negative effects on their job satisfaction. See ORGANIZATIONAL ANALYSIS.

centralization

the concentration of economic decision-making centrally rather than diffusing such decision-making to many different decision-makers. In a country, this is achieved by the adoption of a CENTRALLY PLANNED ECONOMY where the state undertakes to own, control and direct resources into particular uses. In a firm, centralization involves top managers retaining authority to make all major decisions and issuing detailed instructions to particular divisions and departments.

See U-FORM ORGANIZATION.

References in periodicals archive ?
Under democratic centralism, the decisionmaking process is first democratic discussion and then consensus on opinions on a democratic basis, which guarantees the decisionmaking process responds to public opinion to the greatest extent.
centralism, but rather a form of centralism in which the interests of
If we regard Edo as one nation, it can be contended that Tokugawa's feudalistic centralism is the formation of an empire whose internal colonization was operated by Japan's indigenous imperialism.
Djokic demonstrates that not all Serbs were of the same position concerning state centralism, and that more than a handful of Croats believed in one Yugoslav nation without accepting centralism as a logical consequence.
While acknowledging the validity of Anglicanism's traditional valuing of "dispersed authority" in order to avoid the pitfalls of centralism and the development of an "alternative papacy," he warned against an authority that is "dispersed to the point of dissolution and ineffectiveness.
As Morgan points out, given the association between dependence on Moscow and a corresponding independence of domestic constituencies, any examination of Moscow 'gold' inherently involves an exploration of counterbalanced pressures of autonomy and control which sometimes fortified democratic centralism but which also had the capability to destabilise it.
No one thinks it odd to search for the roots of British democracy or French centralism or U.
The Communist party is also Eurosceptic, like Klaus, it defends national centralism, ie that everything should be decided at national level by a strong government.
The five other chapters explore teachers' resistance to Nazi party attempts to purge the workforce in 1930s Brandenburg, progressive educational reforms in 1930s New Zealand, and Revolutionary Rio de Janeiro, the reinforcement of instrumental, nationalist centralism in post-Ottoman Turkey, and the Al Mahayil experiment in participatory village schools in rural Egypt.
In the Australian constitutional context, "reform" has long been shorthand for centralism, and in recent years has been extended to a vastly increased political role for the judges as well as, of course, some sort of a republic.
We also pointed out how the ensuing several hundred years of American history represented a continuous, growing repudiation of Jeffersonian decentralism, and an intensifying nationalist centralism that culminated in the Behemoth of imperial Washington, D.
They negotiated centralism, federalism, and the degree of authority held by the leadership.