census tract


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census tract

A small, relatively permanent statistical subdivision within a county, generally containing 2,500 to 8,000 people and readily identifiable borders. Similar to block numbering areas (BNAs),but differing only in the local versus federal source of the data used to create the maps. Mapped and numbered by the U.S. government, which provides demographic information at www.census.gov. Third-party resellers of demographic information extrapolate from the census tract data into more personalized demographic areas.

References in periodicals archive ?
Table 3 1995-1996 Birth and 1995-1997 Genital Chlamydia Rates Among 15- to 19-Year-Old Females in Census Tract Quintiles, Based on Low Income
Moreover, to obtain information from 90 percent of the housing units in each census tract, the plan calls for sampling a higher share of units in those tracts that have lower mail-in rates.
Guarrero also wanted to see the varying crime risk within a census tract itself, so he had CAPRisk generate more focused site maps.
Denominators by age group for each census tract were obtained from the 2000 Census for case-patients for 2000-2005 and from the 2010 Census for case-patients for 2006-2011 (13,14).
The second limiting factor is that we assume the heat-related illness will have an equal probability of resulting in hospitalization in any census tract.
Demographic maps can be built using state, county, zip code, zip 3, Census tract, MSA, and city limit geographies.
We computed the minimum travel time between every Census tract in Iowa and the primary practice location of a medical oncologist, either in Iowa or an adjoining state.
Those goals mandated mortgage lending in census tracts with large minority or low-income populations and to minority and low-income people regardless of their residential location.
The first analysis of IPD data that controlled for SES by using census tract measures was a study of 1994-1997 rates in San Francisco County, published by the California EIP (19).
CINCINNATI, July 20, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Children who require hospitalization for several common respiratory illnesses tend to live in inner-city neighborhoods with less than optimal socioeconomic conditions, according to Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center researchers who studied census tract data and hospitalization records.
The agreement requires Associated to invest nearly $200 million through increased home lending in majority-minority census tract areas.