caveat emptor


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Related to caveat emptor: Caveat lector

Caveat Emptor

Latin for "let the buyer beware." It is used in many transactions to indicate that all sales are final and all due diligence is the sole responsibility of the buyer. The phrase is especially common in real estate.

caveat emptor

‘let the buyer beware’: a situation where a supplier of a good or service is under no legal obligation to inform buyers of any defects or deficiencies in the products supplied. It is thus the responsibility of buyers to determine for themselves whether or not the product is satisfactory. Compare CAVEAT VENDOR.

caveat emptor

a Latin phrase meaning ‘let the buyer beware’. Put simply, this means that the supplier has no legal obligation to inform buyers about any defects in his goods or services. The onus is on the buyer to determine for himself or herself that the good or service is satisfactory. Compare CAVEAT VENDOR.

caveat emptor

Means “buyer beware.” The legal doctrine followed in some states that sellers of real property are not required to disclose any defects except those inherently dangerous and not easily discoverable by the purchaser.Contrast with seller disclosure states that affirmatively mandate written disclosure of a wide variety of named deficiencies,plus anything else that might be deemed a property defect.

References in periodicals archive ?
As a consequence of all this uncertainty, commercial dealers could auction slaves either with implied warranties that allowed buyers to recoup their losses or under caveat emptor wherein the buyer was liable for all losses.
Where none of these exceptions are present, caveat emptor will prevent a purchaser from re-opening the contract, if subsequent to conveyance, the purchaser concludes that the land does not have the quality that the purchaser assumed it had.
In 1985, the Florida Supreme Court announced a new rule of law to replace the venerable rule of caveat emptor, at least with regard to residential real estate transactions.
Caveat emptor is well and good, but it's only half the story.
According to the Legal Information Institute, caveat emptor is a Latin phrase for "let the buyer beware.
The bottom line remains caveat emptor," or let the buyer beware.
The framework shows a continuum between caveat emptor and caveat venditor philosophies on which marketing programs are positioned; appropriate and ethical positioning would be determined by an assessment of consumer sovereignty.
Other topics include: Writing Your FIBC Specifications - UN, DOT and NEL; Caveat Emptor - Buyer Beware; Static Electricity, Handling Equipment, Safe Handling Practices and FIBC Recycling/Reconditioning.
Like so many things, JavaScript implementation is somewhat variable between the range of browsers so the author has warranted all scripts work with specific versions of Netscape - they may work on others but caveat emptor here.
Although many jurisdictions in the United States still recognize that the mineral estate is dominant to the servient surface estate, the doctrine of caveat emptor is rarely supported by the courts to vindicate the mineral estate owner in making use of the servient surface estate.
2 For instance, the professions were gaining in power in the 1830s, when Victorian clients needed independent advice to cope with the principle of caveat emptor (let the buyer beware) adopted by rampaging capitalist industry.
Although the sites below were recommended by users or listed on major search engines, the rule on the Web, like elsewhere, is caveat emptor.