proximate cause

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proximate cause

The primary or moving cause of an injury.

References in classic literature ?
The observable fact is that, when a certain complex of stimuli has originally caused a certain complex of reactions, the recurrence of part of the stimuli tends to cause the recurrence of the whole of the reactions.
By this I mean that kind of causation of which I spoke at the beginning of this lecture, that kind, namely, in which the proximate cause consists not merely of a present event, but of this together with a past event.
IF A COMPLEX STIMULUS A HAS CAUSED A COMPLEX REACTION B IN AN ORGANISM, THE OCCURRENCE OF A PART OF A ON A FUTURE OCCASION TENDS TO CAUSE THE WHOLE REACTION B.
in the past, together with X now, cause Y now," we will call A, B, C, .
The most bigoted idolizers of State authority have not thus far shown a disposition to deny the national judiciary the cognizances of maritime causes.
This corresponds with the two first classes of causes, which have been enumerated, as proper for the jurisdiction of the United States.
It has also been asked, what need of the word "equity What equitable causes can grow out of the Constitution and laws of the United States?
These form, altogether, the fifth of the enumerated classes of causes proper for the cognizance of the national courts.
So far, therefore, as either designed or accidental violations of treaties and the laws of nations afford JUST causes of war, they are less to be apprehended under one general government than under several lesser ones, and in that respect the former most favors the SAFETY of the people.
As to those just causes of war which proceed from direct and unlawful violence, it appears equally clear to me that one good national government affords vastly more security against dangers of that sort than can be derived from any other quarter.
The neighborhood of Spanish and British territories, bordering on some States and not on others, naturally confines the causes of quarrel more immediately to the borderers.
But not only fewer just causes of war will be given by the national government, but it will also be more in their power to accommodate and settle them amicably.