Casuistry

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Casuistry

1. In law, the act of applying a rule or principle to a theoretical situation in order to see how it holds up.

2. In law, the act of generalizing an unusual situation in order to form a rule or principle based on it.

3. Derogatory, faulty reasoning.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, he had to wrestle with it, to make the kinds of distinctions we have seen: if he had not, then the casuistical door might be thrown open, permitting who knows what to enter.
On a more systematic level, I hope to have contributed in some small way to the sorely needed reintegration of the Catholic casuistical tradition with the intention-based, virtue-oriented Thomistic moral anthropology that was its most important progenitor.
A reader unfamiliar with the two relatively recent works on Donne and casuistry, Dwight Cathcart's Doubting Conscience (1975) and Camille Slights's The Casuistical Tradition (1981) will find Brown's study a useful and workmanlike book.
Practical reasoning: principled or casuistical or both?
And third, the civil war, regicide, and new Cromwellian government posed a series of casuistical dilemmas involving the subject's allegiance to the sovereign that echoed debates about political contract and the marriage contract.
Real cases, on the other hand, are more likely to display the sort of moral complexity and untidiness that demand the (non-deductive) weighing and balancing of competing moral considerations and the casuistical virtues of discernment and practical judgment (phronesis).
In describing the development of the commission's guidelines, one member notes that although the eleven commissioners had different ethical, religious, and professional orientations, "so long as the Commission stayed on the taxonomic or casuistical level, they usually agreed in their practical conclusions.
Our view has been that a careful analysis and specification of principles is consistent with a wide variety of types of ethical theory, including virtue theory and some accounts that came to recent prominence after we wrote the book, such as communitarian theories, casuistical theories, the ethics of care, etc.
Its worst failing may be its enormous reluctance to question the conventional ends and goals of medicine, thereby running a constant risk of simply legitimating, by way of ethical tinkering and casuistical fussiness, the way things are.
In The Abuse of Casuistry, Jonsen and Toulmin attempt to make this method more explicit, connect it to the historical tradition of casuistical reasoning in moral theology, and show how it might be fruitfully applied to contemporary moral controversies.