CO

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CO

The two-character ISO 3166 country code for COLOMBIA.

CO

1. ISO 3166-1 alpha-2 code for the Republic of Colombia. This is the code used in international transactions to and from Colombian bank accounts.

2. ISO 3166-2 geocode for Colombia. This is used as an international standard for shipping to Colombia. Each Colombian department and the capital district have their own codes with the prefix "CO." For example, the code for the Department of Bolivar is ISO 3166-2:CO-BOL.
References in periodicals archive ?
A statistically significant but weak relation was found between the carboxyhemoglobin level and CK-MB, troponin and myoglobulin levels (p<0.
Maximal aerobic capacity at different levels of carboxyhemoglobin.
Reddy measured carboxyhemoglobin and methemoglobin levels using the Rad-57 Pulse CO-Oximeter (Masimo Corp.
In general, though, treatment decisions should be based on symptoms rather than carboxyhemoglobin levels alone, according to experts interviewed by this newspaper.
CO interacts with deoxyhemoglobin and forms carboxyhemoglobin.
Oxygen breathed through a mask at normal pressure for a few hours usually lowers blood carboxyhemoglobin concentrations and combats the nausea, headache, and loss of consciousness that victims experience.
As part of the overall hemoglobin effort, the three-dimensional structure and associated solvent of human carboxyhemoglobin was determined at 2.
After exposure to carbon monoxide, carboxyhemoglobin levels (this is what the pathologist looks for when someone dies from carbon monoxide poisoning) rose from less than 1% to over 5%, and both duration of the exercise test and the measure of maximum effort were reduced as compared to controls.
194 drivers were included; all of them were interviewed, and submitted to medical and physiotherapeutic exams, audiometry, examination of visual acuity and visual field, spirometry and biochemical tests (glycemia, lipid profile, glycosylated hemoglobin and carboxyhemoglobin blood levels before and after working exposition).
First, elevated carboxyhemoglobin levels caused by smoking can lead to chronic hypoxia in both mothers and fetuses.
They cannot distinguish carboxyhemoglobin from oxyhemoglobin.
When breathed, CO has a particular attraction for the hemoglobin in red blood cells, instantly converting the oxygen-carrying hemoglobin to carboxyhemoglobin, which is unable to carry oxygen.