Call

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Call

An option that gives the holder the right to buy the underlying asset.

call

1. An option that permits its holder to purchase a specific asset at a predetermined price until a certain date. For example, an investor may purchase a call option on General Electric stock that confers the right to buy 100 shares at $25 per share until October 17. Calls are sold for a fee by other investors, who incur an obligation. Also called call option. Compare put. See also synthetic call.
2. An issuer's right to repurchase an issue of bonds at a predetermined price before maturity. The feature is used when interest rates fall, so that the bonds can be repurchased and a new, lower-rate issue sold. A call feature is normal for nearly all long-term bond issues, and it operates to the detriment of bond owners. See also call price, cleanup call, extraordinary call, optional call, sinking fund call.
3. Redemption of an issue of bonds before maturity by forcing the bondholders to sell at the call price.

call

To force an option writer to sell shares of stock at a price stipulated in a contract. Stocks usually are called just before the expiration of the options.

Call.

In the bond markets, a call is an issuer's right to redeem bonds it has sold before the date they mature. With preferred stocks, the issuer may call the stock to retire it, or remove it from the marketplace.

In either case, it may be a full call, redeeming the entire issue, or a partial call, redeeming only a portion of the issue.

When a bank makes a secured loan, it reserves the right to demand full repayment of the loan -- referred to as calling the loan -- should the borrower default on interest payments.

Finally, when the term refers to options contracts, holding a call gives you the right to buy the underlying instrument at a specific price by a specific date. Selling a call obligates you to deliver the underlying instrument if the call is exercised and you're assigned to meet the call.

Call

An option to purchase a security at a fixed price within a specified period of time.
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