Cable

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Cable

Exchange rate between British pound sterling and the U.S. dollar.

Cable

1. Informal; the exchange rate between the British pound and the U.S. dollar. This term is used by currency traders, and it originates from the transatlantic cables used to wire the exchange rate between the two currencies in the 19th century.

2. Informal for the GBP.
References in classic literature ?
Also, it meant that cables could henceforth be made longer, with fewer sleeves and splices, and without the oil, which had always been an unmitigated nuisance.
For a time these paper-wound cables were soaked in oil, but in 1890 Engineer F.
They've only gone out jest far 'nough so's not to foul our cable.
The audience dispersed at last, discussing how far they would enjoy crossing an abyss on a wire cable.
With a rattling song the starboard watch bent to their work and hove the cable short, then got the anchor home, and our bark moved off with a stately stride, and soon was bowling along at about two knots an hour.
At dawn she got up and went listlessly and sat down on the cable coil again.
I was as positive that the other end of that little cable protruded through the surface of the inner world as I am that I sit here today in my study--when about midnight of the fourth day I was awakened by the sound of the instrument.
Once satisfied that they were unarmed, she set them to work cutting the cable which held the Kincaid to her anchorage, for her bold plan was nothing less than to set the steamer adrift and float with her out into the open sea, there to trust to the mercy of the elements, which she was confident would be no more merciless than Nikolas Rokoff should he again capture her.
And you hang the expedition up here in this hole-in-the- wall waiting for my agent to cable more wheat-money.
Dudna I cable them from Newcastle, tellun' them the old tank was thot foul she needed dry-dock?
a telegram, transmitted by cable from Valentia (Ireland) to Newfoundland and the American Mainland, arrived at the address of President Barbicane.
What has been trusted to me as the safest means of transmission, might, in an emergency, be committed to a cable.