Byline

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Byline

In journalism, the text usually immediately below the headline giving the name, company and/or position of an article's writer.
References in periodicals archive ?
Byline: BYLINE SPACER: delete this box By STEPHEN WHITE
Reich explained that the byline is a relatively new phenomenon in the history of journalism and that newspapers as respected as The New York Times went out of their way to avoid using bylines as a means of underplaying the importance of the individual reporters.
The only bylines on Friday's front page were for stories from The New York Times and The Washington Post.
BOB MONG, editor, Dallas Morning News: "What we want to do is showcase our staff reporters--that was really the starting point for our policy--and then raise the threshold for bylines from wire services.
If a reporter deserves a byline for reporting but wasn't on scene, they now get bylines but no datelines.
Johnson explains that the translation of marketing bylines requires a special skill and understanding of a company's desired message.
She graduated to the prestigious Miami Herald, becoming the first teenager to receive a byline for her environmental writing, and is now a regular contributor.
AP policy requires that staffers put their bylines on stories they report that are based on anonymous sources," Silverman's memo, sent Friday in anticipation of the strike, states in part.
Management doesn't want its dirty laundry hanging out in the place of empty bylines.
The bylines have disappeared from Arkansas Democrat-Gazette reports on events following the May 11 shootout in Prairie Grove between a police officer and a 12-year-old boy.
Members must be accredited by the Motion Picture Association of America and submit the requisite number of recent paid, published stories with bylines - a minimum of four - in order to earn and maintain membership.
EntreWorld will provide its original Entrepreneur's Bylines to Venture Vortex on an ongoing basis.