buy

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Buy

To purchase an asset; taking a long position.

Buy

To take ownership of some asset in exchange for some monetary remuneration. Buying may take any of several forms. In a cash purchase, the buyer gives cash or a cash equivalent immediately in exchange for the asset. In a credit sale, the buyer takes ownership immediately in exchange for future payment, often with interest. An example of buying is a simple transaction involving widgets. If the buyer is willing to pay $2 per widget and the seller wishes to sell 100 widgets, then the seller gives to the buyer 100 widgets and, in their place, receives $200. See also: Sale.

buy

A bargain-priced asset. For example, an analyst may feel that a particular firm owns valuable assets overlooked or undervalued by the financial community. In such an instance, the firm's stock is considered a buy.

buy

To purchase a security or other asset. Compare sell.

make

or

buy

the decision by a firm on whether to make a component or product itself or to buy it from an external supplier (see OUTSOURCING). The decision will depend upon the combined production costs and TRANSACTION COSTS of the alternatives. Sometimes a firm may adopt mixes of the two policies, producing some quantity of the product itself and buying the remainder, depending upon the relative costs of the sources and security of supply considerations. See TRANSACTION for a more detailed discussion. See INTERNALIZATION, VERTICAL INTEGRATION.
References in periodicals archive ?
The price was much cheaper, so I quit buying Time Warner and bought a lot of Blockbuster [currently around $27].
As a result, she says, 3,4-DAP is best viewed as a way of buying time to get a patient access to preferred therapy--such as treatment with botulism antibodies or respiratory intensive care.
They were buying time until they could figure out what to do, and beginning a unique scientific experiment.
It's probably true that he's buying time,'' said Loyola Law School Professor Laurie Levenson, a former federal prosecutor.
His related business experience includes broadacast time sales and purchasing, including a post as Media Buyer for Young and Rubicam Worldwide Advertising buying time for clients such as Kraft, Kentucky Fried Chicken, Clorox and The US Postal Service.
The company is actively marketing its Realport modem, buying time on the radio to sing the praises of life without a dongle.
Originally intended to allow boards to slow coercive two-tier tender offers while buying time for management to search for a superior deal, poison pills have become a convenient shield for management to hide behind, protecting their jobs, at the expense of shareholders.
In choosing to tap into bond proceeds and other reserves to close a $100 million budget gap for 1996, the authority is buying time to find and effectuate more sustainable budget solutions.