Bund

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Bund

A bond issued by the federal government of Germany. Because it is guaranteed by the federal government, it is considered the safest asset in Germany. See also: U.S. Treasury security.
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14) "Old Bolsheviks," former Bundists, Zionists, and anarchists were denounced and purged as spies, diversionists, fascists, Trotskyites, Bukharinites, National Democrats, and "hangers-on of the bourgeoisie.
72) Bundist Leivik Hodis introduced this resolution in the Smolensk Soviet, which agreed and planned a massive celebration, including representatives of all the Jewish socialist parties and a Bund Choir.
Jewish socialists including the numerically significant Bundists opposed Zionism as a reactionary diversion from the task of fighting antisemitism and defending Jewish rights in the Diaspora.
9) While this name, promoted by the Bundist delegates and accepted by the others only after some debate, recognized the party's multinational character, some years later Stalin would lay claim to it as an attempt by the ethnic-Russian socialists "to break down the national barriers," that is, as a manifestation of the ethnic Russian social-democrats' generosity.
Roni Gechtman, "Sports in Yiddish: The Bundist Sport
The initial enthusiasm of Magnes, Pine, Schlossberg, and others for the Labor Zionist projects foundered when the Bundist leader Vladimir Medem publicly attacked Shohat and the Histadrut delegation in the leading Yiddish daily Der forverts (The Forward) in December 1921.
105) No doubt, this view coincided with that of many Forverts readers, especially those with a Bundist pedigree.
And when he learned that my mother's views had been shaped by her first boyfriend in Bialystok, a confirmed Bundist (Socialist), he went onto a full attack.
That party was the ostensibly anti-Leninist CCF, as shaped especially by David Lewis, the ardent Labour Bundist whose "parliamentary Marxism" was not as far removed from the perspective of the CP as he would later make it out to be.
I myself grew up as a child talking two languages simultaneously, Hebrew and Yiddish because my grandmother was a Bundist and she refused to learn Hebrew until her last day, and she spoke Yiddish and read Yiddish.
Coming to write on Jewish topics rather late in life as he did, Kuznets betrayed in these essays little hint of the former youngster from Pinsk who was once drawn to radical Bundist ideas.
For more than a decade, Klepfisz focused on feminist and gay concerns, not knowing how to integrate them with her Yiddish-speaking, Bundist background.